Research Topic

Low-damage Earthquake-resistant Structures Achieved via Structural Movability

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Current seismic design philosophy tolerates a degree of damage at locations predefined by the designer (e.g. in forms of plastic hinges in beams of a multi-storey building) as long as a complete structure collapse is precluded. By tolerating plastic deformations, construction costs can also be reduced. Major ...

Current seismic design philosophy tolerates a degree of damage at locations predefined by the designer (e.g. in forms of plastic hinges in beams of a multi-storey building) as long as a complete structure collapse is precluded. By tolerating plastic deformations, construction costs can also be reduced. Major earthquakes, e.g. the Canterbury earthquakes, showed that well-designed structures behave as anticipated: Beam-column joints suffered damage as the designer intended, while the occupants remained a life. However, repair costs were often high (as high as 90% of new building value). In addition, costs accrue because structures and infrastructure are no longer fit for purpose (down time). These costs are very difficult to predict.

In contrast to current seismic design where structures are typically assumed to be fixed at the base, low-damage design can be achieved by activating rigid-like body movement of structural members, i.e. via a partial separation at the footing and/or throughout the structure while responding to earthquake loading. Hence, development of forces related to local deformation in the structure will be prevented. No local member deformation produces no stress development, and hence, associated damage to structural members. The down time from structural damage can thus be prevented.

This Research Topic encourages the authors to submit their recent research results. Suitable article themes include, but are not limited to, the following:
1) Holistic structural behaviour by including the surroundings
2) Upliftable and/or rocking structures
3) Experimental and numerical investigations
4) Behaviour of a single structure-footing-soil (SFS) system
5) Structure-soil-adjacent structure interaction in earthquakes
6) Seismic behaviour of clustered SFS systems
7) Nonlinear SFS interaction
8) Recommendations for codes of practice


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