Research Topic

Roles of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Embryonic Development and Cellular Homeostasis

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Advances in genomics over the past two decades have established that more than two thirds of the eukaryotic genome is pervasively transcribed, while just >2% codes for protein. Intriguingly, the degree of organismal complexity appears proportional to the transcribed non-coding portion of the genome.

The majority of non-coding transcripts are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). LncRNAs represent a class of non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that have aptitude for regulating gene expression at myriad avenues from embryonic development to metastasis. Current estimates indicate that there are >58,000 lncRNAs encoded by the human genome which have emerged as important players acting via mechanisms that range from effects on chromatin organization to regulation of mRNA translation.

In an effort to further foster the in-depth study of lncRNAs, the editors of this thematic issue – Dr. Leo Kurian (Cologne), Prof. Ingrid Grummt (Heidelberg) and Dr. Argyris Papantonis (Cologne) – seek to compile an ensemble of original research papers, comprehensive reviews, and out-of-the-box perspective articles and essays.

Particular emphasis is placed on, but not limited to, the following subtopics:
- Introduction or benchmarking of computational tools for the discovery and annotation of lncRNAs
- Description of novel algorithms and molecular tools that can predict and chart structural, functional, and evolutionary properties of lncRNAs
- Functional and mechanistic characterization of lncRNAs in the context of embryonic development or in the maintenance/disruption of cellular homeostasis


Keywords: long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), embryonic development, cellular homeostasis, chromatin, RNA-mediated interactions


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Advances in genomics over the past two decades have established that more than two thirds of the eukaryotic genome is pervasively transcribed, while just >2% codes for protein. Intriguingly, the degree of organismal complexity appears proportional to the transcribed non-coding portion of the genome.

The majority of non-coding transcripts are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). LncRNAs represent a class of non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that have aptitude for regulating gene expression at myriad avenues from embryonic development to metastasis. Current estimates indicate that there are >58,000 lncRNAs encoded by the human genome which have emerged as important players acting via mechanisms that range from effects on chromatin organization to regulation of mRNA translation.

In an effort to further foster the in-depth study of lncRNAs, the editors of this thematic issue – Dr. Leo Kurian (Cologne), Prof. Ingrid Grummt (Heidelberg) and Dr. Argyris Papantonis (Cologne) – seek to compile an ensemble of original research papers, comprehensive reviews, and out-of-the-box perspective articles and essays.

Particular emphasis is placed on, but not limited to, the following subtopics:
- Introduction or benchmarking of computational tools for the discovery and annotation of lncRNAs
- Description of novel algorithms and molecular tools that can predict and chart structural, functional, and evolutionary properties of lncRNAs
- Functional and mechanistic characterization of lncRNAs in the context of embryonic development or in the maintenance/disruption of cellular homeostasis


Keywords: long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), embryonic development, cellular homeostasis, chromatin, RNA-mediated interactions


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top