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Manuscript Submission Deadline 18 March 2024

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Plant pathogens cause plant diseases, yield and postharvest losses, and many people become sick of unsafe food. Plant diseases result from the interaction of a pathogen with a susceptible host in a favorable environment, and it is not only temperature and wetting period that affect disease development but also other factors such as light. Both plants and pathogens respond to light, and the absence or presence of light is known to be a signal that regulates many properties of plant pathogens, directly or indirectly influencing disease development. For plant pathogenic fungi, the presence and/or absence of light is also an orientation signal (night/day; above/below the plant surface), thus depending on the ecological niche of the pathogen, light can control its reproductive structures (photomorphogenesis), dispersal (phototropism of reproductive structures), adaptive protective response (accumulation of pigments), and circadian rhythms. Changes in the quantity or quality of light influence the growth of many pathogens.

Solar light is further classified into a broad range of electromagnetic waves, and each region in the solar spectrum bears its unique actions in the universe or biosphere. For centuries, solar light has been believed to be a potent source of killing pathogens, causing postharvest losses on food products and human skin diseases. Optimized light parameters could be prevented or inhibit plant pathogens’s occurrence. EU directive 2009/128/EC aims to reduce the use of chemical pesticides due to the increased resistance and adverse effects on humans and the environment. There is a need for new alternative and sustainable plant protection measures. Identifying new and environment-safer plant protection means to control fungal pathogens is essential. Postharvest illumination with different wavelengths is an alternative to traditional fungicides and can be used on various fruit and vegetables for sanitization or pathogen control. In addition to these applications, other effects are detected in vegetal cells, including metabolism and secondary metabolite production changes, which directly affect disease control response mechanisms.

We invite researchers to submit original scientific articles, reviews, and communications, which address the light effect on plant disease, host and fungal phytopathogen, and light as a new food safety-fungi and fungal disease management of different crops. The scope of the issue includes studies focusing on the latest developments of light for plant protection and different schemes of applications. In addition, we welcome manuscripts related to fundamental and applied research on Plant- and light-fungi response.

Keywords: pathogens, growth, inhibition, interactions


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Plant pathogens cause plant diseases, yield and postharvest losses, and many people become sick of unsafe food. Plant diseases result from the interaction of a pathogen with a susceptible host in a favorable environment, and it is not only temperature and wetting period that affect disease development but also other factors such as light. Both plants and pathogens respond to light, and the absence or presence of light is known to be a signal that regulates many properties of plant pathogens, directly or indirectly influencing disease development. For plant pathogenic fungi, the presence and/or absence of light is also an orientation signal (night/day; above/below the plant surface), thus depending on the ecological niche of the pathogen, light can control its reproductive structures (photomorphogenesis), dispersal (phototropism of reproductive structures), adaptive protective response (accumulation of pigments), and circadian rhythms. Changes in the quantity or quality of light influence the growth of many pathogens.

Solar light is further classified into a broad range of electromagnetic waves, and each region in the solar spectrum bears its unique actions in the universe or biosphere. For centuries, solar light has been believed to be a potent source of killing pathogens, causing postharvest losses on food products and human skin diseases. Optimized light parameters could be prevented or inhibit plant pathogens’s occurrence. EU directive 2009/128/EC aims to reduce the use of chemical pesticides due to the increased resistance and adverse effects on humans and the environment. There is a need for new alternative and sustainable plant protection measures. Identifying new and environment-safer plant protection means to control fungal pathogens is essential. Postharvest illumination with different wavelengths is an alternative to traditional fungicides and can be used on various fruit and vegetables for sanitization or pathogen control. In addition to these applications, other effects are detected in vegetal cells, including metabolism and secondary metabolite production changes, which directly affect disease control response mechanisms.

We invite researchers to submit original scientific articles, reviews, and communications, which address the light effect on plant disease, host and fungal phytopathogen, and light as a new food safety-fungi and fungal disease management of different crops. The scope of the issue includes studies focusing on the latest developments of light for plant protection and different schemes of applications. In addition, we welcome manuscripts related to fundamental and applied research on Plant- and light-fungi response.

Keywords: pathogens, growth, inhibition, interactions


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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