Research Topic

Vascular Network Regeneration in Spinal Cord Injury - The Spatiotemporal Expression and Modulation of Angiogenic Proteins

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About this Research Topic

After spinal cord injury (SCI), the vasculature is disrupted and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is compromised. Severe haemorrhage is predominantly observed in grey matter, but could also be seen in white matter. Angiogenesis precedes functional recovery following SCI, and its extent correlates with neural regeneration. An angiogenic factor not only promotes angiogenesis but also can inhibit vascular destabilisation. For instance, angiogenic proteins such as fibroblast growth factor can promote proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells; vascular endothelial growth factors can affect vascular permeability, angiopoietin-1 and 2 can stabilise vessels and so on. Therefore, understanding the vascular response and expression pattern of angiogenic proteins, which can regulate angiogenesis, is desirable to engineer the vascular network after SCI. Angiogenic factors can be delivered in the form of recombinant proteins or by gene transfer using vectors. Also, pharmacological interventions can increase the expression of angiogenic proteins. It is envisioned that new approaches to spinal cord regeneration can open unprecedented opportunities and could be utilised for neural regeneration. In the present Research Topic, we would like to invite investigators to contribute original research or review articles for a better understanding for the expression pattern of angiogenic proteins and its correlation with vascular responses and neural regeneration after SCI.


Keywords: spinal cord injury, vascularization, neural regeneration, regeneration, angiogenesis, blood -spinal cord barrier


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

After spinal cord injury (SCI), the vasculature is disrupted and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is compromised. Severe haemorrhage is predominantly observed in grey matter, but could also be seen in white matter. Angiogenesis precedes functional recovery following SCI, and its extent correlates with neural regeneration. An angiogenic factor not only promotes angiogenesis but also can inhibit vascular destabilisation. For instance, angiogenic proteins such as fibroblast growth factor can promote proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells; vascular endothelial growth factors can affect vascular permeability, angiopoietin-1 and 2 can stabilise vessels and so on. Therefore, understanding the vascular response and expression pattern of angiogenic proteins, which can regulate angiogenesis, is desirable to engineer the vascular network after SCI. Angiogenic factors can be delivered in the form of recombinant proteins or by gene transfer using vectors. Also, pharmacological interventions can increase the expression of angiogenic proteins. It is envisioned that new approaches to spinal cord regeneration can open unprecedented opportunities and could be utilised for neural regeneration. In the present Research Topic, we would like to invite investigators to contribute original research or review articles for a better understanding for the expression pattern of angiogenic proteins and its correlation with vascular responses and neural regeneration after SCI.


Keywords: spinal cord injury, vascularization, neural regeneration, regeneration, angiogenesis, blood -spinal cord barrier


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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