Research Topic

Epidemiology and Pathophysiology of Neonatal Outcomes in Patients Developing the Great Obstetrical Syndromes

About this Research Topic

In the era in which research is running towards the explanation of the mechanism of the diseases, it is highly required to the field of perinatal medicine to be able to improve both maternal and neonatal outcomes in those women developing the “Great Obstetrical Syndromes”, namely preterm labor, preterm prelabor rupture of membranes, intrauterine growth restriction, placental abruption, preeclampsia in its different forms, and fetal demise extended to intrapartum and postpartum death.

The Great Obstetrical Syndromes represent a group of conditions recognizing multiple underlying mechanisms of disease, ranging from defective placentation to inflammation and immunological conditions, and that are not completely explained yet. These dangerous pregnancy complications are an important burden for women and fetuses soon becoming neonates with a huge impact in terms of social costs. As an example, neonates born prematurely are at an increased risk of short-term complications attributed to immaturity of multiple organ systems as well as neurodevelopmental disorders, such as cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, vision and hearing impairments.

There is an increasing body of literature dealing with the maternal side in the development of the Great Obstetrical Syndromes. Moreover, there is not enough information regarding the fetal side that is all the time from conception communicating with the mother and contributing in the pathophysiology of these syndromes in a way that needs further clarification. 

Special interest should be dedicated to the maternal-fetal interface, the placenta, that cannot be anymore considered merely as an apposition or fusion of the fetal membranes to the uterine mucosa for physiological exchange. The function of this organ is widely recognized as influencing the outcome of the pregnancy as well as the long term outcomes of the offspring.

We decided to take an additional challenge, represented by the association of epidemiology to pathophysiology. This is aimed to encourage the authors to provide not only the description and report of data but to develop, from these numbers, a pathogenetic hypothesis increasing the clinical value of this field of research and opening new doors for future projects.

Therefore, the present article collection has a precise purpose to offer suggestions on how and why Great Obstetrical Syndromes may alter or affect neonatal life. This Topic will offer an updated review/state of art on the most recent research related to the epidemiology and pathophysiology of neonatal outcomes related to the Great Obstetrical Syndromes.


Keywords: Neonatal outcomes, preterm delivery, preterm prom, iugr, preeclampsia


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In the era in which research is running towards the explanation of the mechanism of the diseases, it is highly required to the field of perinatal medicine to be able to improve both maternal and neonatal outcomes in those women developing the “Great Obstetrical Syndromes”, namely preterm labor, preterm prelabor rupture of membranes, intrauterine growth restriction, placental abruption, preeclampsia in its different forms, and fetal demise extended to intrapartum and postpartum death.

The Great Obstetrical Syndromes represent a group of conditions recognizing multiple underlying mechanisms of disease, ranging from defective placentation to inflammation and immunological conditions, and that are not completely explained yet. These dangerous pregnancy complications are an important burden for women and fetuses soon becoming neonates with a huge impact in terms of social costs. As an example, neonates born prematurely are at an increased risk of short-term complications attributed to immaturity of multiple organ systems as well as neurodevelopmental disorders, such as cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, vision and hearing impairments.

There is an increasing body of literature dealing with the maternal side in the development of the Great Obstetrical Syndromes. Moreover, there is not enough information regarding the fetal side that is all the time from conception communicating with the mother and contributing in the pathophysiology of these syndromes in a way that needs further clarification. 

Special interest should be dedicated to the maternal-fetal interface, the placenta, that cannot be anymore considered merely as an apposition or fusion of the fetal membranes to the uterine mucosa for physiological exchange. The function of this organ is widely recognized as influencing the outcome of the pregnancy as well as the long term outcomes of the offspring.

We decided to take an additional challenge, represented by the association of epidemiology to pathophysiology. This is aimed to encourage the authors to provide not only the description and report of data but to develop, from these numbers, a pathogenetic hypothesis increasing the clinical value of this field of research and opening new doors for future projects.

Therefore, the present article collection has a precise purpose to offer suggestions on how and why Great Obstetrical Syndromes may alter or affect neonatal life. This Topic will offer an updated review/state of art on the most recent research related to the epidemiology and pathophysiology of neonatal outcomes related to the Great Obstetrical Syndromes.


Keywords: Neonatal outcomes, preterm delivery, preterm prom, iugr, preeclampsia


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2017 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2017 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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