Research Topic

Renal Hypertension at the Crossroads: Theoretical, Experimental and Clinical Aspects

About this Research Topic

Since Goldblatt’s seminal experiment in 1934 (J. Exp. Med. 59: 347, 1934), renal hypertension has increasingly been recognized as an important cause of clinically atypical hypertension and chronic kidney disease, the latter by virtue of renal ischemia. Followed later by important work, the scientific community recognized that the kidney not only increases blood pressure by renal artery occlusion and is victim to hypertension-related injury, but also contributes to arterial blood pressure by an array of multiple systemic or local mechanisms, which all contribute to renal hypertension.

Our goal for this Frontiers Research Topic is to highlight the significant reach of the kidney in blood pressure regulation, from renovascular hypertension due to renal artery-occlusive disease to renoparenchymal hypertension and genes involved in renal salt homeostasis. In doing so, we explicitly place findings that can be taken advantage of in creating new therapies for cardiovascular diseases that continue to challenge our community. These include resistant hypertension, renal artery interventions, medical genetics, diabetes and salt consumption in health and disease to name a few.


Keywords: Renovascular, renoparenchymal, genetics, salt conservation, denervation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Since Goldblatt’s seminal experiment in 1934 (J. Exp. Med. 59: 347, 1934), renal hypertension has increasingly been recognized as an important cause of clinically atypical hypertension and chronic kidney disease, the latter by virtue of renal ischemia. Followed later by important work, the scientific community recognized that the kidney not only increases blood pressure by renal artery occlusion and is victim to hypertension-related injury, but also contributes to arterial blood pressure by an array of multiple systemic or local mechanisms, which all contribute to renal hypertension.

Our goal for this Frontiers Research Topic is to highlight the significant reach of the kidney in blood pressure regulation, from renovascular hypertension due to renal artery-occlusive disease to renoparenchymal hypertension and genes involved in renal salt homeostasis. In doing so, we explicitly place findings that can be taken advantage of in creating new therapies for cardiovascular diseases that continue to challenge our community. These include resistant hypertension, renal artery interventions, medical genetics, diabetes and salt consumption in health and disease to name a few.


Keywords: Renovascular, renoparenchymal, genetics, salt conservation, denervation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 December 2017 Manuscript
15 December 2017 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 December 2017 Manuscript
15 December 2017 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top