Research Topic

Targeting Divisomal Proteins with Antibacterial Inhibitors

About this Research Topic

The rise of multidrug resistance among the bacterial pathogens has become a major health concern. Earlier this year, WHO has published the list of 12 drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, for which the development of antibacterial drugs with novel modes of action is urgently needed.

Cell division has generated considerable interest as a promising, albeit clinically underexplored antibacterial target. Cell division is a fundamental biological property, and thus many of the divisomal proteins are essential for and ubiquitously present in bacterial species. The main problem in targeting these proteins is in that the main bacterial division proteins have structural homologues among the eukaryotes such as humans ‐FtsZ, which is a structural homologue of tubulin and FtsA has a
similar structure to actin‐,

However, specific experimental inhibitors of bacterial division proteins have been identified that do not affect the human homologues. And finally, the availability of cell‐based phenotypic screening methods, biochemical assays and crystal structures, have made several of these proteins suitable for drug design and screening.



This Research Topic aims attract researchers that are interested in the development of antibiotics that interfere with the mechanisms of cell division. To enable the contributors to benefit from mutually shared ideas and to form new networks of complementary knowledge, we aim to gather new understanding and knowledge on cell division protein target validation and on new cell division inhibitors. Given the urgency of the antibiotic resistance problem, exploring inhibitors that work in synergy with known antibiotics, novel experimental approaches and specific screening assays would be most welcome.

Original research papers, new method descriptions, opinions and reviews covering chemical, biological, biophysical and multidisciplinary approaches are welcome.


Keywords: Antibacterial, Inhibitors, Divisomal Proteins


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The rise of multidrug resistance among the bacterial pathogens has become a major health concern. Earlier this year, WHO has published the list of 12 drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, for which the development of antibacterial drugs with novel modes of action is urgently needed.

Cell division has generated considerable interest as a promising, albeit clinically underexplored antibacterial target. Cell division is a fundamental biological property, and thus many of the divisomal proteins are essential for and ubiquitously present in bacterial species. The main problem in targeting these proteins is in that the main bacterial division proteins have structural homologues among the eukaryotes such as humans ‐FtsZ, which is a structural homologue of tubulin and FtsA has a
similar structure to actin‐,

However, specific experimental inhibitors of bacterial division proteins have been identified that do not affect the human homologues. And finally, the availability of cell‐based phenotypic screening methods, biochemical assays and crystal structures, have made several of these proteins suitable for drug design and screening.



This Research Topic aims attract researchers that are interested in the development of antibiotics that interfere with the mechanisms of cell division. To enable the contributors to benefit from mutually shared ideas and to form new networks of complementary knowledge, we aim to gather new understanding and knowledge on cell division protein target validation and on new cell division inhibitors. Given the urgency of the antibiotic resistance problem, exploring inhibitors that work in synergy with known antibiotics, novel experimental approaches and specific screening assays would be most welcome.

Original research papers, new method descriptions, opinions and reviews covering chemical, biological, biophysical and multidisciplinary approaches are welcome.


Keywords: Antibacterial, Inhibitors, Divisomal Proteins


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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