Research Topic

Ozone Fluxes to Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems

About this Research Topic

Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a well-known secondary pollutant in the atmosphere, which can induce great damage on materials, human health and plants. Due to its oxidative capacity, it plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. Yet, as a greenhouse gas, it also contributes to global warming, both directly (due to its positive radiative forcing) and indirectly (due to its deleterious effects on plant functioning affecting the carbon sink).

Dry deposition to terrestrial ecosystem is the only net sink for O3. During the last decades, many studies have attempted to quantify this sink and understand the underlying processes governing O3 dry deposition. Although many advances were made, some uncertainty remains, especially concerning the reliability of the different flux measurement techniques (e.g., eddy-covariance vs aerodynamic profile method vs chambers), quantification of stomatal, cuticular, and soil deposition as well as chemical depletion above and within the canopy, and their relative contribution in total O3 deposition.

This Research Topic in the International Journal “Frontiers in Environmental Sciences” is dedicated to O3 fluxes quantification and understanding to natural (i.e., forests, grasslands) and agricultural ecosystems from the plant to the landscape scales. We particularly encourage submissions that mainly address , but is not limited to, the following priority topics:
- Comparison of measurement techniques,
- Stomatal, cuticular, and soil deposition processes (biological, physical, and chemical) for different pedoclimatic and land-use/land cover conditions,
- Drivers of stomatal and non stomatal deposition,
- Assessment and comparison of the O3 deposition budgets,
- Comparative analysis of natural and agricultural ecosystems,
- Feedbacks on other greenhouse gas and pollutant exchanges.


Keywords: Ozone, stomatal deposition, non stomatal deposition, stomatal and non stomatal deposition, terrestrial ecosystems, field measurements


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a well-known secondary pollutant in the atmosphere, which can induce great damage on materials, human health and plants. Due to its oxidative capacity, it plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. Yet, as a greenhouse gas, it also contributes to global warming, both directly (due to its positive radiative forcing) and indirectly (due to its deleterious effects on plant functioning affecting the carbon sink).

Dry deposition to terrestrial ecosystem is the only net sink for O3. During the last decades, many studies have attempted to quantify this sink and understand the underlying processes governing O3 dry deposition. Although many advances were made, some uncertainty remains, especially concerning the reliability of the different flux measurement techniques (e.g., eddy-covariance vs aerodynamic profile method vs chambers), quantification of stomatal, cuticular, and soil deposition as well as chemical depletion above and within the canopy, and their relative contribution in total O3 deposition.

This Research Topic in the International Journal “Frontiers in Environmental Sciences” is dedicated to O3 fluxes quantification and understanding to natural (i.e., forests, grasslands) and agricultural ecosystems from the plant to the landscape scales. We particularly encourage submissions that mainly address , but is not limited to, the following priority topics:
- Comparison of measurement techniques,
- Stomatal, cuticular, and soil deposition processes (biological, physical, and chemical) for different pedoclimatic and land-use/land cover conditions,
- Drivers of stomatal and non stomatal deposition,
- Assessment and comparison of the O3 deposition budgets,
- Comparative analysis of natural and agricultural ecosystems,
- Feedbacks on other greenhouse gas and pollutant exchanges.


Keywords: Ozone, stomatal deposition, non stomatal deposition, stomatal and non stomatal deposition, terrestrial ecosystems, field measurements


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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