Research Topic

Nanostructure Surface Modification for Energy Storage Applications

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About this Research Topic

As a purposeful human activity, energy storage has existed since pre-historic era. Interest in storing power from several intermittent sources grows as the renewable energy industry begins to generate a larger fraction of overall energy consumption.

The requirement for reliable and cost effective power in remote areas and isolated locations to service communities, remote mine sites and agricultural areas in the world provides both considerable challenges and opportunities. Current limitations of power generation systems such as solar and wind power are their intermittency and the fact that maximum production periods do not correspond to the times of highest demand. This limits the usefulness of solar and wind power in areas without back-up of grid connections.

Therefore an urgent requirement of renewable energy is the capacity to store converted solar energy. Solar radiation only occurs during daylight but the energy demand of private household's increases in the evening. Without cheap storage, electrical energy has to be used immediately and thus it is difficult to match electrical energy demand with the variable supply of renewable energy. Currently, two main concepts are in development to address this problem. The first is the direct conversion of solar energy into storable fuels based upon photocatalytic processes. The second concept is storage via batteries. A lot of research efforts are being made by the scientific community to develop an efficient electrode material to store energy. This call will help the scientific community to significantly contribute to the development of efficient and low cost batteries, and photocatalytic processes. There are several sources of energy e.g. solar energy, wind energy etc. but the problem is to store this energy and again reuse it when needed. For that a high energy storage capacity electrode is required. Electrode design that has a very large surface area, high conductivity and long durability is required. Modified nanostructured surfaces of porous silicon, graphene, carbon nanotube, metal organic framework and other nanostructured material might be few of the key materials to develop high energy storage electrodes.

This call for papers encompasses comprehensive coverage of an exciting and dynamic field which joins nanoscience, nanotechnology, and materials science with energy science. Manuscripts of two types will be considered: review articles which inform readers of the latest research and advances in energy science and full-length research articles which report comprehensive research developments in related fields. The editors welcome original contributions from researchers and authors exploring interdisciplinary coverage of modified nano-structured surface materials to renewable energy that bring together the work of chemists, physicists, materials scientists, ceramists, biologists, and electronic engineers.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

• High surface area electrode based on porous materials
• Nanostructured materials
• Functionalized carbon nanotube and 2D materials
• Energy storage electrode for batteries and supercapacitors
• Renewable energy storage materials
• Nanostructures material synthesis using porous materials
• Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks


Keywords: Porous silicon, Graphene, Metal-organic Frameworks, Renewable Energy, Nanostructured Materials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

As a purposeful human activity, energy storage has existed since pre-historic era. Interest in storing power from several intermittent sources grows as the renewable energy industry begins to generate a larger fraction of overall energy consumption.

The requirement for reliable and cost effective power in remote areas and isolated locations to service communities, remote mine sites and agricultural areas in the world provides both considerable challenges and opportunities. Current limitations of power generation systems such as solar and wind power are their intermittency and the fact that maximum production periods do not correspond to the times of highest demand. This limits the usefulness of solar and wind power in areas without back-up of grid connections.

Therefore an urgent requirement of renewable energy is the capacity to store converted solar energy. Solar radiation only occurs during daylight but the energy demand of private household's increases in the evening. Without cheap storage, electrical energy has to be used immediately and thus it is difficult to match electrical energy demand with the variable supply of renewable energy. Currently, two main concepts are in development to address this problem. The first is the direct conversion of solar energy into storable fuels based upon photocatalytic processes. The second concept is storage via batteries. A lot of research efforts are being made by the scientific community to develop an efficient electrode material to store energy. This call will help the scientific community to significantly contribute to the development of efficient and low cost batteries, and photocatalytic processes. There are several sources of energy e.g. solar energy, wind energy etc. but the problem is to store this energy and again reuse it when needed. For that a high energy storage capacity electrode is required. Electrode design that has a very large surface area, high conductivity and long durability is required. Modified nanostructured surfaces of porous silicon, graphene, carbon nanotube, metal organic framework and other nanostructured material might be few of the key materials to develop high energy storage electrodes.

This call for papers encompasses comprehensive coverage of an exciting and dynamic field which joins nanoscience, nanotechnology, and materials science with energy science. Manuscripts of two types will be considered: review articles which inform readers of the latest research and advances in energy science and full-length research articles which report comprehensive research developments in related fields. The editors welcome original contributions from researchers and authors exploring interdisciplinary coverage of modified nano-structured surface materials to renewable energy that bring together the work of chemists, physicists, materials scientists, ceramists, biologists, and electronic engineers.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

• High surface area electrode based on porous materials
• Nanostructured materials
• Functionalized carbon nanotube and 2D materials
• Energy storage electrode for batteries and supercapacitors
• Renewable energy storage materials
• Nanostructures material synthesis using porous materials
• Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks


Keywords: Porous silicon, Graphene, Metal-organic Frameworks, Renewable Energy, Nanostructured Materials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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