Research Topic

Host Physiological Response to Infection in Animal Models of Human Disease

About this Research Topic

From the earliest days of medicine it has been appreciated that there is a physiological response to infection, the most commonly reported being fever and tachycardia. Cardiac dysfunction and respiratory distress have been associated with increased mortality from infectious disease. Animal studies have replicated what has been reported in humans. This Research Topic will look at the relationship between physiological response and outcome in small and large animal models of human infectious diseases.

Electrocardiogram and echocardiogram have been used to study changes in cardiac function. Plethysmography can evaluate respiratory changes associated with not just bacterial or viral pneumonia but viral encephalitis. Radiotelemetry implants allow for continuous monitoring of physiological responses in awake, conscious animals. This eliminates concerns over restraint or anesthesia impacting interpretation of physiological changes. Modern devices are minimally invasive and allow for longitudinal studies in multiple animals simultaneously, including social housing. Monitoring options range from simple (core body temperature) to complex functions such as measuring pressure (blood pressure, pleural pressure) or biopotential (ECG, EEG, EOG).

Although radiotelemetry has mostly been used in biodefense, it has recently been applied to the study of infectious diseases. Radiotelemetry has been used to characterize existing and newly developed disease models, identify biomarkers or correlates of disease that might translate to the human condition, seek potential triggers for therapeutic intervention, and determine efficacy of medical countermeasures. This Research Topic will highlight the application of radiotelemetry, plethysmography and other modalities for studying physiological responses to infectious diseases and the underlying mechanisms behind these responses in animal models.


Keywords: Infectious disease, fever, respiratory, heart, animal model


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

From the earliest days of medicine it has been appreciated that there is a physiological response to infection, the most commonly reported being fever and tachycardia. Cardiac dysfunction and respiratory distress have been associated with increased mortality from infectious disease. Animal studies have replicated what has been reported in humans. This Research Topic will look at the relationship between physiological response and outcome in small and large animal models of human infectious diseases.

Electrocardiogram and echocardiogram have been used to study changes in cardiac function. Plethysmography can evaluate respiratory changes associated with not just bacterial or viral pneumonia but viral encephalitis. Radiotelemetry implants allow for continuous monitoring of physiological responses in awake, conscious animals. This eliminates concerns over restraint or anesthesia impacting interpretation of physiological changes. Modern devices are minimally invasive and allow for longitudinal studies in multiple animals simultaneously, including social housing. Monitoring options range from simple (core body temperature) to complex functions such as measuring pressure (blood pressure, pleural pressure) or biopotential (ECG, EEG, EOG).

Although radiotelemetry has mostly been used in biodefense, it has recently been applied to the study of infectious diseases. Radiotelemetry has been used to characterize existing and newly developed disease models, identify biomarkers or correlates of disease that might translate to the human condition, seek potential triggers for therapeutic intervention, and determine efficacy of medical countermeasures. This Research Topic will highlight the application of radiotelemetry, plethysmography and other modalities for studying physiological responses to infectious diseases and the underlying mechanisms behind these responses in animal models.


Keywords: Infectious disease, fever, respiratory, heart, animal model


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

29 December 2017 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

29 December 2017 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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