Research Topic

Proteomics of Food and Environmental Plant Allergens

About this Research Topic

Plants are a major source of food and airborne allergens and affect the quality of life for an increasing amount of the population. Pollen from plants such as ragweed, grasses, and trees are the most common allergens due to their airborne exposure. Furthermore, the foods that most frequently cause allergic reactions include various plants such as peanuts, tree nuts, wheat and soy – though it is apparent a hypo-allergenic food crop does not exist. The allergy-causing molecular component in the various plants and plant parts are proteins, and hence proteomics is a suitable approach for investigating plant allergens and allergies. In this regard, proteomic technologies have been used for allergen discovery through targeted, absolute quantitation of specific allergens. This research topic aims to present the latest research efforts addressing the issues of: 1) what are the strategies applied to identify and quantify allergy-causing plant proteins; 2) what are the identities and sequences of identified allergenic proteins from various plants; 3) which are the strategies aimed at mitigating allergies to food plants; 4) what are the molecular reactions to exposure to plant-derived allergens in humans or mouse models. The research topic, while being focused on plant allergens, can therefore span all the range from botany to biotechnology and human medicine. We welcome all types of articles including original research, methods, opinions, and reviews that provide new insights on plant allergens and plant allergies attained through the use of mass spectrometry-based or alternative proteomic methods.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Plants are a major source of food and airborne allergens and affect the quality of life for an increasing amount of the population. Pollen from plants such as ragweed, grasses, and trees are the most common allergens due to their airborne exposure. Furthermore, the foods that most frequently cause allergic reactions include various plants such as peanuts, tree nuts, wheat and soy – though it is apparent a hypo-allergenic food crop does not exist. The allergy-causing molecular component in the various plants and plant parts are proteins, and hence proteomics is a suitable approach for investigating plant allergens and allergies. In this regard, proteomic technologies have been used for allergen discovery through targeted, absolute quantitation of specific allergens. This research topic aims to present the latest research efforts addressing the issues of: 1) what are the strategies applied to identify and quantify allergy-causing plant proteins; 2) what are the identities and sequences of identified allergenic proteins from various plants; 3) which are the strategies aimed at mitigating allergies to food plants; 4) what are the molecular reactions to exposure to plant-derived allergens in humans or mouse models. The research topic, while being focused on plant allergens, can therefore span all the range from botany to biotechnology and human medicine. We welcome all types of articles including original research, methods, opinions, and reviews that provide new insights on plant allergens and plant allergies attained through the use of mass spectrometry-based or alternative proteomic methods.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 December 2017 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 December 2017 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top