Research Topic

Application of Remote Sensing Techniques to Wind Engineering

About this Research Topic

Remote sensing techniques, such as Doppler radar/LiDAR, LiDAR ranging or satellite/high-resolution image spectrometry, are becoming more prominent in wind engineering. These techniques are used to acquire information about wind flow, surface characteristics (i.e. roughness elements) or wind impacts on built and natural environments. They have many advantages over traditional point-based measurement techniques, in that they can, over very short periods of time, sample large volumes or areas, acquiring detailed, and in many instances spatially continuous, information about wind or its impacts. Given measurements are taken remotely, these techniques also lend themselves to situations where data acquisition is either dangerous (e.g. within a tornado) or logistically challenging in the immediate aftermath of a catastrophic wind event. This means that the use of remote sensing not only enhances measurements using current method, but also facilitates the acquisition of new data not previously captured.

However, while remotely sensed information has its advantages, the integration of these data into wind engineering research and practice is not straightforward or without its challenges. For example, Doppler-based wind measurements represent a spatio-temporally averaged wind signal. This means they are not directly comparable to the point-based anemometer measurements used globally to define boundary layer structure or to undertake climatological wind hazard assessments. Also, while high-resolution imagery and LiDAR point-cloud fields can provide rapid information about the state of structures or vegetation immediately following a severe wind event, how this information is used to forensically diagnose the reason for damage, as would be done during a field survey, is less clear.

It is clear therefore that understanding the strengths and weaknesses of remote sensing techniques and exploring how they can be applied to wind engineering is important for progressing the field. This Research Topic seeks to explore the questions of, how remote sensing techniques are currently used by wind researchers, and moving forward, how they can be better utilized to enhance our understanding of wind and its impacts on the built and natural environment. Contributions are welcomed from researchers investigating issues that may include, but are not limited to:
• Remotely sensed wind and turbulence measurements,
• Characterization of transient wind event (e.g. outflows, tornadoes, tropical cyclones) structure and flow fields,
• Urban boundary layer and canopy flow measurements,
• Climatological applications of Doppler wind measurements,
• Planetary surface roughness characterization with LiDAR,
• Remote damage assessment using satellite and air-borne imagery,
• Validation or inter-technique comparison studies.
Researchers from across the range of wind-related disciplines are invited to contribute to this Frontiers Research Topic.


Keywords: Doppler, Radar, Lidar, Wind, Damage


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Remote sensing techniques, such as Doppler radar/LiDAR, LiDAR ranging or satellite/high-resolution image spectrometry, are becoming more prominent in wind engineering. These techniques are used to acquire information about wind flow, surface characteristics (i.e. roughness elements) or wind impacts on built and natural environments. They have many advantages over traditional point-based measurement techniques, in that they can, over very short periods of time, sample large volumes or areas, acquiring detailed, and in many instances spatially continuous, information about wind or its impacts. Given measurements are taken remotely, these techniques also lend themselves to situations where data acquisition is either dangerous (e.g. within a tornado) or logistically challenging in the immediate aftermath of a catastrophic wind event. This means that the use of remote sensing not only enhances measurements using current method, but also facilitates the acquisition of new data not previously captured.

However, while remotely sensed information has its advantages, the integration of these data into wind engineering research and practice is not straightforward or without its challenges. For example, Doppler-based wind measurements represent a spatio-temporally averaged wind signal. This means they are not directly comparable to the point-based anemometer measurements used globally to define boundary layer structure or to undertake climatological wind hazard assessments. Also, while high-resolution imagery and LiDAR point-cloud fields can provide rapid information about the state of structures or vegetation immediately following a severe wind event, how this information is used to forensically diagnose the reason for damage, as would be done during a field survey, is less clear.

It is clear therefore that understanding the strengths and weaknesses of remote sensing techniques and exploring how they can be applied to wind engineering is important for progressing the field. This Research Topic seeks to explore the questions of, how remote sensing techniques are currently used by wind researchers, and moving forward, how they can be better utilized to enhance our understanding of wind and its impacts on the built and natural environment. Contributions are welcomed from researchers investigating issues that may include, but are not limited to:
• Remotely sensed wind and turbulence measurements,
• Characterization of transient wind event (e.g. outflows, tornadoes, tropical cyclones) structure and flow fields,
• Urban boundary layer and canopy flow measurements,
• Climatological applications of Doppler wind measurements,
• Planetary surface roughness characterization with LiDAR,
• Remote damage assessment using satellite and air-borne imagery,
• Validation or inter-technique comparison studies.
Researchers from across the range of wind-related disciplines are invited to contribute to this Frontiers Research Topic.


Keywords: Doppler, Radar, Lidar, Wind, Damage


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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