Research Topic

Neuroendocrine Actions of Protein Digestion-derived Peptides

About this Research Topic

The gut-brain axis is implicated in numerous physiological functions such as energy homeostasis. The notion of gut-brain axis encompasses signaling from gastrointestinal hormones released in the blood and acting at their brain receptors and neural signals to the brain deriving from the gastrointestinal system. Thus, dietary proteins exert a high satiating effect via different pathways including, gut hormone secretion stimulation, amino acid circulating level increase, energy expenditure and gluconeogenesis stimulation. Nevertheless the mechanisms occurring in the gut implicated in these pathways are still partially unraveled. Gastrointestinal digestion of dietary protein leads to the release of free amino acids, oligopeptides (mainly di- and tripeptides) and potential bioactive peptides resistant to digestion. These last years, numerous works have pointed out the implication of protein-digestion derived peptides in several physiological functions, but their numerous bioactivities have to be better understood and characterized. Oligopeptides and some digestion-resistant peptides of higher range exhibit mu-opioid activity, which makes of peripheral and central mu-opioid receptors potential key actors in the potential satiety effects of dietary protein.
The bioavailability of peptides derived from protein digestion represents also a key point of peptide bioactivity; and their release from food matrix, their resistance to the interaction with the gut barrier and their transport through this epithelium are aspects which remain still poorly understood.

We encourage contributions to this topic exploring the implication of protein-derived peptides in the regulation of food intake and homeostasis.


Keywords: Satiety effect of protein, gastrointestinal hormones, mu-opioid receptors, gastrointestinal nervous system, Protein digestion


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The gut-brain axis is implicated in numerous physiological functions such as energy homeostasis. The notion of gut-brain axis encompasses signaling from gastrointestinal hormones released in the blood and acting at their brain receptors and neural signals to the brain deriving from the gastrointestinal system. Thus, dietary proteins exert a high satiating effect via different pathways including, gut hormone secretion stimulation, amino acid circulating level increase, energy expenditure and gluconeogenesis stimulation. Nevertheless the mechanisms occurring in the gut implicated in these pathways are still partially unraveled. Gastrointestinal digestion of dietary protein leads to the release of free amino acids, oligopeptides (mainly di- and tripeptides) and potential bioactive peptides resistant to digestion. These last years, numerous works have pointed out the implication of protein-digestion derived peptides in several physiological functions, but their numerous bioactivities have to be better understood and characterized. Oligopeptides and some digestion-resistant peptides of higher range exhibit mu-opioid activity, which makes of peripheral and central mu-opioid receptors potential key actors in the potential satiety effects of dietary protein.
The bioavailability of peptides derived from protein digestion represents also a key point of peptide bioactivity; and their release from food matrix, their resistance to the interaction with the gut barrier and their transport through this epithelium are aspects which remain still poorly understood.

We encourage contributions to this topic exploring the implication of protein-derived peptides in the regulation of food intake and homeostasis.


Keywords: Satiety effect of protein, gastrointestinal hormones, mu-opioid receptors, gastrointestinal nervous system, Protein digestion


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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01 April 2018 Manuscript

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Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 April 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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