Research Topic

Eosinophilic Esophagitis

About this Research Topic

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease with a young history but increasing recognition and prevalence. It was first reported only 20 years ago by Attwood et al. (Attwood SE Dig Dis Sci 1993). EoE is defined as a chronic inflammatory immune antigen-mediated disease of the esophagus, characterized by eosinophil-predominant inflammation, that manifests in different ways such as dysphagia, bolus impaction or mere feeding refusal. For a long time, it was regarded as a rare disease. Meanwhile, it commonly presents in childhood and appears to be increasing in incidence worldwide (Hruz P et al J Allerg Clin Immu 2011). The pathophysiological mechanisms causing the development of EoE are largely unknown. The hypothesis that the eosinophilic infiltration is triggered by exogenic allergens is supported by murine experimental studies and clinical amelioration after the introduction of an oligoantigenic elimination diet. Various factors appear to contribute to pathogenesis, some of which may also be genetically determined, while others relate to environmental exposures triggering a complex Th2 driven immune response involving eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. 

We welcome investigators and clinicians to contribute with original research articles as well as review articles and commentaries that will stimulate the continuing efforts to understand the immunological mechanisms including chemotaxis, molecular patterns, natural history, and prognostic features of EoE in childhood. These efforts will then be used to expedite the development of novel strategies to treat these conditions and improve patient outcomes. 

We are particularly interested in articles describing features of EoE unique to children, aspects related to the pathophysiology, the role of chemotaxis and chemoattractants, gene-environment interactions, novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and insights into the future care of patients. We welcome submissions related to the full spectrum of biomedical and clinical research, from basic-science approaches, including animal models, through translational research, to clinical and epidemiological observations and therapeutics. The main emphasis will be on novelty and potential for future impact on the biology and care of pediatric EoE. 

Potential topics include, but are not limited to: Unique etiologies of pediatric EoE, role of chemokines and chemotaxis, allergic predisposition and genetics; Global epidemiologic insights and trends; Biology-based and clinical-based phenotypes; Development of biomarkers and prognostic tools; Development of novel animal models; Leading the way to new treatments; Improving patient care, safety, and quality of life.


Keywords: esophagitis, eosinophils, chemotaxis, chronic inflammation, biomarkers


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease with a young history but increasing recognition and prevalence. It was first reported only 20 years ago by Attwood et al. (Attwood SE Dig Dis Sci 1993). EoE is defined as a chronic inflammatory immune antigen-mediated disease of the esophagus, characterized by eosinophil-predominant inflammation, that manifests in different ways such as dysphagia, bolus impaction or mere feeding refusal. For a long time, it was regarded as a rare disease. Meanwhile, it commonly presents in childhood and appears to be increasing in incidence worldwide (Hruz P et al J Allerg Clin Immu 2011). The pathophysiological mechanisms causing the development of EoE are largely unknown. The hypothesis that the eosinophilic infiltration is triggered by exogenic allergens is supported by murine experimental studies and clinical amelioration after the introduction of an oligoantigenic elimination diet. Various factors appear to contribute to pathogenesis, some of which may also be genetically determined, while others relate to environmental exposures triggering a complex Th2 driven immune response involving eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. 

We welcome investigators and clinicians to contribute with original research articles as well as review articles and commentaries that will stimulate the continuing efforts to understand the immunological mechanisms including chemotaxis, molecular patterns, natural history, and prognostic features of EoE in childhood. These efforts will then be used to expedite the development of novel strategies to treat these conditions and improve patient outcomes. 

We are particularly interested in articles describing features of EoE unique to children, aspects related to the pathophysiology, the role of chemotaxis and chemoattractants, gene-environment interactions, novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and insights into the future care of patients. We welcome submissions related to the full spectrum of biomedical and clinical research, from basic-science approaches, including animal models, through translational research, to clinical and epidemiological observations and therapeutics. The main emphasis will be on novelty and potential for future impact on the biology and care of pediatric EoE. 

Potential topics include, but are not limited to: Unique etiologies of pediatric EoE, role of chemokines and chemotaxis, allergic predisposition and genetics; Global epidemiologic insights and trends; Biology-based and clinical-based phenotypes; Development of biomarkers and prognostic tools; Development of novel animal models; Leading the way to new treatments; Improving patient care, safety, and quality of life.


Keywords: esophagitis, eosinophils, chemotaxis, chronic inflammation, biomarkers


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 January 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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