Research Topic

Obesity and Disorders of Metabolism in HIV-infection: Accelerants of Diseases of Ageing

About this Research Topic

The widening availability of combined antiretroviral therapy has transformed the outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) infection from premature mortality to usual life expectancy and restored quality of life. However, treated HIV-infection is associated with accelerated onset of diseases of ageing, particularly atherothrombotic coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus and some cancers. Underlying these clinical conditions are treatment-associated disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism, fat partitioning, disturbances of adipocyte function and immune function and increased circulating and tissue based-inflammation.

Evidence of increased susceptibility to cardiometabolic disease was evident prior to the modern obesity epidemic and most of the cohorts studied were, in the majority, healthy weight. Little is known however of the impact of the obesity epidemic on these cardiometabolic conditions and their pathophysiology in HIV infection, which is the focus of this Research Topic.

This Research Topic invites manuscripts examining the impact of obesity and abdominal obesity in all aspects of health in treated HIV-infection.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The widening availability of combined antiretroviral therapy has transformed the outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) infection from premature mortality to usual life expectancy and restored quality of life. However, treated HIV-infection is associated with accelerated onset of diseases of ageing, particularly atherothrombotic coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus and some cancers. Underlying these clinical conditions are treatment-associated disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism, fat partitioning, disturbances of adipocyte function and immune function and increased circulating and tissue based-inflammation.

Evidence of increased susceptibility to cardiometabolic disease was evident prior to the modern obesity epidemic and most of the cohorts studied were, in the majority, healthy weight. Little is known however of the impact of the obesity epidemic on these cardiometabolic conditions and their pathophysiology in HIV infection, which is the focus of this Research Topic.

This Research Topic invites manuscripts examining the impact of obesity and abdominal obesity in all aspects of health in treated HIV-infection.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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