Research Topic

Genetics and Genomics of Polyploid Plants

About this Research Topic

Among the most economically important crops worldwide, many are polyploids or paleopolyploids. Their genomes result from ancient genome duplications followed by diploidization, a process responsible for the re-establishment of a diploid genome configuration. In this process, however, certain genes may be retained in multiple copies. Polyploids can broaden a species’ genetic base and increase allele diversity and heterozygosity that can lead to novel phenotypic variation. Moreover, many polyploid plants show an increased size of harvested organs. The information gained through the study of ploidy relationships between species has greatly improved our understanding of the genetic origin of several crops and facilitated their improvement.

Polyploid genetics, and especially autoploid genetics, are often more complicated than diploid genetics because of their more complex segregation ratios. This is especially true for the study of the inheritance of quantitative traits. With the rapid advancement in sequencing technologies, several whole genome sequencing projects for polyploid and paleopolyploid plants have been completed successfully. Moreover, greatly improved statistical and bioinformatics tools, molecular cytogenetics as well as novel gene editing tools have become available. With these advancements, it is now possible for scientists to illustrate the details of genome evolution, inheritance of quantitative traits, functional genomics and genotype by environment (G x E) interactions, among others for polyploid plants.

In this Research Topic we seek to build a collection of articles addressing important subjects related to the genetics and genomics of polyploid plants. Studies on genome relationships and evolution, inheritance of economically important traits, development of enabling technologies or methods that facilitate genetics and genomics studies in polyploidy plants are welcome. The goal is to advance our understanding of polyploid plant genome evolution and its impact on phenotypic variation, and to provide insights and tools that can be used for crop improvement. We encourage the submission of Original Research articles, Reviews, Mini Reviews, Methods, Perspectives, and Opinions.


Keywords: Polyploid, Genetics, Genomics, Evolution, Genotype by Environment


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Among the most economically important crops worldwide, many are polyploids or paleopolyploids. Their genomes result from ancient genome duplications followed by diploidization, a process responsible for the re-establishment of a diploid genome configuration. In this process, however, certain genes may be retained in multiple copies. Polyploids can broaden a species’ genetic base and increase allele diversity and heterozygosity that can lead to novel phenotypic variation. Moreover, many polyploid plants show an increased size of harvested organs. The information gained through the study of ploidy relationships between species has greatly improved our understanding of the genetic origin of several crops and facilitated their improvement.

Polyploid genetics, and especially autoploid genetics, are often more complicated than diploid genetics because of their more complex segregation ratios. This is especially true for the study of the inheritance of quantitative traits. With the rapid advancement in sequencing technologies, several whole genome sequencing projects for polyploid and paleopolyploid plants have been completed successfully. Moreover, greatly improved statistical and bioinformatics tools, molecular cytogenetics as well as novel gene editing tools have become available. With these advancements, it is now possible for scientists to illustrate the details of genome evolution, inheritance of quantitative traits, functional genomics and genotype by environment (G x E) interactions, among others for polyploid plants.

In this Research Topic we seek to build a collection of articles addressing important subjects related to the genetics and genomics of polyploid plants. Studies on genome relationships and evolution, inheritance of economically important traits, development of enabling technologies or methods that facilitate genetics and genomics studies in polyploidy plants are welcome. The goal is to advance our understanding of polyploid plant genome evolution and its impact on phenotypic variation, and to provide insights and tools that can be used for crop improvement. We encourage the submission of Original Research articles, Reviews, Mini Reviews, Methods, Perspectives, and Opinions.


Keywords: Polyploid, Genetics, Genomics, Evolution, Genotype by Environment


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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14 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

14 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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