Research Topic

Paleoceanographic Conditions in High Northern Latitudes during Quaternary Interglaciations

About this Research Topic

Current climate warming is dramatically amplified in high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, notably through sea-ice retreat and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. These processes, in turn, trigger feedback mechanisms affecting ocean temperature and circulation. These oceanographic mechanisms and interactions with sea ice, the atmosphere and adjacent land areas need to be investigated in order to understand the extent and further development of the ongoing climate change.

Paleoceanographic reconstructions of past interglacial periods in high northern latitudes can provide useful insights and scenarios for future climate prediction. However, such reconstructions in subpolar and polar environments involve multiple challenges due to a strong influence of melt water, issues with quantifying the cold end of temperature calibrations, restricted species’ compositions in many biological groups, and more. Significant recent advances in developing new paleoceanographic methods (especially in the field of geochemistry and biogeochemistry) and elaborating existing methods allow for evaluation of past changes in seasonal sea-ice extent, salinity, and ocean circulation. Paleo-temperature estimations of surface, subsurface and bottom waters also have been considerably improved.

In this Research Topic, we welcome contributions exploring oceanic environments in high northern latitudes during the pronounced Quaternary interglacial periods, especially Marine Isotope Stages 11, 9, 5e, and 1, by means of various paleoceanographical methods, from paleontological to biogeochemical. Suborbital and millennial-scale reconstructions of oceanic conditions and circulation are especially encouraged.


Keywords: Paleoceanography, Quaternary Interglacials, High northern latitudes, Arctic amplification


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Current climate warming is dramatically amplified in high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, notably through sea-ice retreat and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. These processes, in turn, trigger feedback mechanisms affecting ocean temperature and circulation. These oceanographic mechanisms and interactions with sea ice, the atmosphere and adjacent land areas need to be investigated in order to understand the extent and further development of the ongoing climate change.

Paleoceanographic reconstructions of past interglacial periods in high northern latitudes can provide useful insights and scenarios for future climate prediction. However, such reconstructions in subpolar and polar environments involve multiple challenges due to a strong influence of melt water, issues with quantifying the cold end of temperature calibrations, restricted species’ compositions in many biological groups, and more. Significant recent advances in developing new paleoceanographic methods (especially in the field of geochemistry and biogeochemistry) and elaborating existing methods allow for evaluation of past changes in seasonal sea-ice extent, salinity, and ocean circulation. Paleo-temperature estimations of surface, subsurface and bottom waters also have been considerably improved.

In this Research Topic, we welcome contributions exploring oceanic environments in high northern latitudes during the pronounced Quaternary interglacial periods, especially Marine Isotope Stages 11, 9, 5e, and 1, by means of various paleoceanographical methods, from paleontological to biogeochemical. Suborbital and millennial-scale reconstructions of oceanic conditions and circulation are especially encouraged.


Keywords: Paleoceanography, Quaternary Interglacials, High northern latitudes, Arctic amplification


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Abstract
27 June 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 January 2018 Abstract
27 June 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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