Research Topic

Immunophysiology of Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases

About this Research Topic

Pediatric Rheumatology has come of age. Research advances over the last ten years have shown that many rheumatic diseases in children have biochemical, genetic, and clinical features that are distinct from those seen in adults. They can no longer be considered as mere early manifestations of adult rheumatic disease. This is perhaps not surprising given the accompanying normal developmental processes that direct/modify clinical disease manifestations and future outcomes, or are themselves those that are organically altered in utero. Therefore, this Research Topic will bring to the forefront scientific advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and immunobiology of pediatric rheumatic diseases.

We welcome the submission of articles that synthesize research advances in our understanding of the immune and/or inflammatory mechanisms underlying rheumatic diseases in children. Contributors are encouraged to include findings from animal models; comparisons / distinctions from adult disease and/or clinical aspects related to the (i) immune; (ii) inflammatory and (iii) biochemical processes of pediatric rheumatic disease. The overall goal is to highlight unique immunobiology / biology, which may provide lessons and insights into innovations in the management of rheumatic diseases in childhood, rather than simply adopt those developed in adults.

We welcome the submission of Review, Mini-Review and Original Research articles that cover, but are not limited to, the following topics:

1. Early-onset autoinflammatory diseases.
2. Immunologic basis of efficacious therapy in pediatric rheumatic diseases.
3. The role of different immune cell types in pediatric rheumatic diseases.
4. Immunogenetics and transcriptomics in pediatric rheumatic diseases.
5. The immunology of iuvenile idiopathic arthritis (all clinical types).
6. The immunology of juvenile dermatomyositis.
7. The immunology of pediatric scleroderma, and /or soft tissue diseases.
8. The immunology of pediatric vessel disease (all types of vasculitis).
9. The immunology of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.
10. Comparative studies of pediatric versus adult rheumatic disease .


Keywords: Autoimmunity, Inflammation, Pediatrics, Rheumatology, Therapeutics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Pediatric Rheumatology has come of age. Research advances over the last ten years have shown that many rheumatic diseases in children have biochemical, genetic, and clinical features that are distinct from those seen in adults. They can no longer be considered as mere early manifestations of adult rheumatic disease. This is perhaps not surprising given the accompanying normal developmental processes that direct/modify clinical disease manifestations and future outcomes, or are themselves those that are organically altered in utero. Therefore, this Research Topic will bring to the forefront scientific advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and immunobiology of pediatric rheumatic diseases.

We welcome the submission of articles that synthesize research advances in our understanding of the immune and/or inflammatory mechanisms underlying rheumatic diseases in children. Contributors are encouraged to include findings from animal models; comparisons / distinctions from adult disease and/or clinical aspects related to the (i) immune; (ii) inflammatory and (iii) biochemical processes of pediatric rheumatic disease. The overall goal is to highlight unique immunobiology / biology, which may provide lessons and insights into innovations in the management of rheumatic diseases in childhood, rather than simply adopt those developed in adults.

We welcome the submission of Review, Mini-Review and Original Research articles that cover, but are not limited to, the following topics:

1. Early-onset autoinflammatory diseases.
2. Immunologic basis of efficacious therapy in pediatric rheumatic diseases.
3. The role of different immune cell types in pediatric rheumatic diseases.
4. Immunogenetics and transcriptomics in pediatric rheumatic diseases.
5. The immunology of iuvenile idiopathic arthritis (all clinical types).
6. The immunology of juvenile dermatomyositis.
7. The immunology of pediatric scleroderma, and /or soft tissue diseases.
8. The immunology of pediatric vessel disease (all types of vasculitis).
9. The immunology of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.
10. Comparative studies of pediatric versus adult rheumatic disease .


Keywords: Autoimmunity, Inflammation, Pediatrics, Rheumatology, Therapeutics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2018 Abstract
30 September 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2018 Abstract
30 September 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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