Research Topic

Autoimmune Liver Diseases

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About this Research Topic

Autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) in childhood encompass three different groups of low incidence diseases: (1) Autoimmune hepatitis (Type 1 or 2 according to the antibody pattern and postinfantile giant cell hepatitis) (2) Sclerosing cholangitis (neonatal, primary or with signs of autoimmune hepatitis - overlap or autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis) and (3) De-novo autoimmune hepatitis (appearing in patients after liver transplantation due to a disease other than autoimmune hepatitis).

The diagnosis and management of these conditions can pose a challenge, especially in view of the small number of affected children in combination with the severity of the disease in childhood. Diagnosis of these AILD is currently based upon consensus statements from European and American pediatric gastroenterologist societies and experts. It comprises patient history, serological markers, histology and radiologic imaging. Scoring systems help in defining disease certainty. The current treatment approaches are based on large observational studies or expert opinions, without data from randomized controlled studies. Consequently, there is a need for additional data in regards both diagnosis and management of these conditions.

This Research Topic will focus on AILD classification, diagnostic criteria, new therapy strategies and future treatment options.


Keywords: Hepatitis, Cholangitis, Posttransplantation, Giant cell hepatitis, Autoimmune cholangitis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) in childhood encompass three different groups of low incidence diseases: (1) Autoimmune hepatitis (Type 1 or 2 according to the antibody pattern and postinfantile giant cell hepatitis) (2) Sclerosing cholangitis (neonatal, primary or with signs of autoimmune hepatitis - overlap or autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis) and (3) De-novo autoimmune hepatitis (appearing in patients after liver transplantation due to a disease other than autoimmune hepatitis).

The diagnosis and management of these conditions can pose a challenge, especially in view of the small number of affected children in combination with the severity of the disease in childhood. Diagnosis of these AILD is currently based upon consensus statements from European and American pediatric gastroenterologist societies and experts. It comprises patient history, serological markers, histology and radiologic imaging. Scoring systems help in defining disease certainty. The current treatment approaches are based on large observational studies or expert opinions, without data from randomized controlled studies. Consequently, there is a need for additional data in regards both diagnosis and management of these conditions.

This Research Topic will focus on AILD classification, diagnostic criteria, new therapy strategies and future treatment options.


Keywords: Hepatitis, Cholangitis, Posttransplantation, Giant cell hepatitis, Autoimmune cholangitis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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