Research Topic

Transcription Factor Interaction With Epigenome

About this Research Topic

This Research Topic has been realized in collaboration with Dr Sandra Schick .

Precise control of transcription factors (TFs) establishes cell-type specific gene regulation programs. In a multi-cellular organism, different cell-types utilize the same genetic makeup yet establish distinct functions. Such diversity in cell types despite sharing the same genome is achieved through cell-type specific gene regulation by precise control of transcription factors (TFs). TFs play an essential role in establishing these cell-identities by driving the cell-type specific gene-regulatory program. Throughout evolution, the expansion of TF families in multi-cellular organisms is hypothesized as a way to organize the more complex transcription regulation by means of combinatorial TF actions. TFs bind to their relatively short motif sequences that occur at promoters or enhancers. However, it is not entirely understood how these TFs recognize their cell-type specific in vivo targets from all potential motifs across the genome. The current knoweledge indicates that the shape and sequence of DNA alone cannot explain the differences that are observed between functional in vivo binding sites and non-functional motif sequences present in the genome.

Recently, several studies have implicated that the underlying chromatin landscape might be playing an essential role in cell-type specific TF binding. Furthermore, the distal regulatory elements, which gain cell-type specific epigenetic properties, are known to be dynamically utilized by the action of specific TFs during differentiation. Despite recent advances, the interactions between the epigenome and TF mediated gene regulatory landscape during cellular specification and differentiation is still not well-defined. A necessary step towards understanding the cellular differentiation is to understand the basic principles that dictate the dynamic utilization of regulatory regions by TFs and how these interactions are affected by the dynamic changes in the underlying epigenetic landscape. Comprehension of these mechanisms will also be of enormous therapeutic relevance, as epigenetic alterations driving miss-regulated transcriptional programs occur in various acute and chronic diseases.

This Research Topic will focus on studies related to transcription factor and epigenome interactions throughout development and disease. We welcome researchers working in the fields of epigenomics transcription factors in development, cellular differentiation, and disease progression to submit abstracts of their Original Research articles as well are Reviews to contribute. Some of the potential topics include:
1) Dynamics of TFs and epigenome landscape during cellular differentiation.
2) TF and epigenome interactions during reprogramming.
3) Linking of TF activity with epigenome maintenance.
4) Pioneer TFs as a tool to remodel epigenome.
5) Methods to predict influence of epigenome on TF binding.
6) Transcription factor during early development.
7) TF and epigenome modeling using deep learning.
8) Epigenomic regulation in acute and chronic disease.


Keywords: Epigenetics, Development, Differentiation, Disease, Reprogramming


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

This Research Topic has been realized in collaboration with Dr Sandra Schick .

Precise control of transcription factors (TFs) establishes cell-type specific gene regulation programs. In a multi-cellular organism, different cell-types utilize the same genetic makeup yet establish distinct functions. Such diversity in cell types despite sharing the same genome is achieved through cell-type specific gene regulation by precise control of transcription factors (TFs). TFs play an essential role in establishing these cell-identities by driving the cell-type specific gene-regulatory program. Throughout evolution, the expansion of TF families in multi-cellular organisms is hypothesized as a way to organize the more complex transcription regulation by means of combinatorial TF actions. TFs bind to their relatively short motif sequences that occur at promoters or enhancers. However, it is not entirely understood how these TFs recognize their cell-type specific in vivo targets from all potential motifs across the genome. The current knoweledge indicates that the shape and sequence of DNA alone cannot explain the differences that are observed between functional in vivo binding sites and non-functional motif sequences present in the genome.

Recently, several studies have implicated that the underlying chromatin landscape might be playing an essential role in cell-type specific TF binding. Furthermore, the distal regulatory elements, which gain cell-type specific epigenetic properties, are known to be dynamically utilized by the action of specific TFs during differentiation. Despite recent advances, the interactions between the epigenome and TF mediated gene regulatory landscape during cellular specification and differentiation is still not well-defined. A necessary step towards understanding the cellular differentiation is to understand the basic principles that dictate the dynamic utilization of regulatory regions by TFs and how these interactions are affected by the dynamic changes in the underlying epigenetic landscape. Comprehension of these mechanisms will also be of enormous therapeutic relevance, as epigenetic alterations driving miss-regulated transcriptional programs occur in various acute and chronic diseases.

This Research Topic will focus on studies related to transcription factor and epigenome interactions throughout development and disease. We welcome researchers working in the fields of epigenomics transcription factors in development, cellular differentiation, and disease progression to submit abstracts of their Original Research articles as well are Reviews to contribute. Some of the potential topics include:
1) Dynamics of TFs and epigenome landscape during cellular differentiation.
2) TF and epigenome interactions during reprogramming.
3) Linking of TF activity with epigenome maintenance.
4) Pioneer TFs as a tool to remodel epigenome.
5) Methods to predict influence of epigenome on TF binding.
6) Transcription factor during early development.
7) TF and epigenome modeling using deep learning.
8) Epigenomic regulation in acute and chronic disease.


Keywords: Epigenetics, Development, Differentiation, Disease, Reprogramming


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

29 March 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

29 March 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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