Research Topic

Improving CPR and Post-Resuscitation Critical Care

About this Research Topic

Children suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) have always had the worst long-term outcomes. Can streamlining the process of prehospital, emergency room (ER) and post-resuscitation care lead to better results? While pediatric emergency medicine and critical care physicians across all medical systems have always strived to meet this goal, the current evidence and experience suggest there is significant room for improvement. 
 
The most important tasks for the ambulance staff or paramedics are rapid response, correct rescue, and immediate goal-directed CPR before reaching the hospital. Effective implementation of this approach can prevent worsening of the disease, limit neurologic disabilities or other organ damage and prevent death. Severe brain hypoxia lasting for 4-6 minutes can cause irreversible injury, often leading to brain death. During the “golden hour” the pre-hospital ambulance staff, emergency room physicians, and post-resuscitation critical care physicians must coordinate their care and continuously support the patient. Important tasks during the golden hour include early identification and initiation of emergency medical rescue systems, early implementation of CPR, early electroshock defibrillation, minimize interruptions in CPR and implement advanced high-level life-saving techniques like ECMO.

We think that this issue is quite important and timely for three major reasons:
1) First, the American Heart Association (AHA) just revised the guidelines for pediatric shock and cardiac arrest resuscitation in January 2018 (Pediatric Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation evidence review). 
2) All emergency medical staff, primary physicians, surgeons, and ICU medical staffs must regularly update their knowledge in this field. Therefore, topics focused on prehospital, emergency and post resuscitation care are of great interest and will be useful at this time.
3) Lastly, the changing landscape of pre- and post-hospital CPR may generate new hypotheses or illustrate the best practices that directly impact long-term outcomes. 

Given the Topic presented here is narrow, we welcome submissions which include prospective or retrospective studies, case reports and case series, reviews and mini-reviews. Additionally, we are looking for related technical innovations, study protocols, personal notes and experience reports. Furthermore, reports on the application of telemedicine, AI and ML in pediatric resuscitation and outcome research, including translational technical research on devices and laboratory research.
 
The Topic is open to experts within pediatric emergency medicine, resuscitation and intensive care, pediatric prehospital emergency care, pediatric rehabilitation, pediatric cardiology, pediatric neurology and pediatric traumatology.

It is our hope that many programs can acquire this knowledge from this Open Access collection with Frontiers in Pediatrics.


Keywords: prehospital, emergency, resuscitation, critical care, cardiac arrest


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Children suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) have always had the worst long-term outcomes. Can streamlining the process of prehospital, emergency room (ER) and post-resuscitation care lead to better results? While pediatric emergency medicine and critical care physicians across all medical systems have always strived to meet this goal, the current evidence and experience suggest there is significant room for improvement. 
 
The most important tasks for the ambulance staff or paramedics are rapid response, correct rescue, and immediate goal-directed CPR before reaching the hospital. Effective implementation of this approach can prevent worsening of the disease, limit neurologic disabilities or other organ damage and prevent death. Severe brain hypoxia lasting for 4-6 minutes can cause irreversible injury, often leading to brain death. During the “golden hour” the pre-hospital ambulance staff, emergency room physicians, and post-resuscitation critical care physicians must coordinate their care and continuously support the patient. Important tasks during the golden hour include early identification and initiation of emergency medical rescue systems, early implementation of CPR, early electroshock defibrillation, minimize interruptions in CPR and implement advanced high-level life-saving techniques like ECMO.

We think that this issue is quite important and timely for three major reasons:
1) First, the American Heart Association (AHA) just revised the guidelines for pediatric shock and cardiac arrest resuscitation in January 2018 (Pediatric Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation evidence review). 
2) All emergency medical staff, primary physicians, surgeons, and ICU medical staffs must regularly update their knowledge in this field. Therefore, topics focused on prehospital, emergency and post resuscitation care are of great interest and will be useful at this time.
3) Lastly, the changing landscape of pre- and post-hospital CPR may generate new hypotheses or illustrate the best practices that directly impact long-term outcomes. 

Given the Topic presented here is narrow, we welcome submissions which include prospective or retrospective studies, case reports and case series, reviews and mini-reviews. Additionally, we are looking for related technical innovations, study protocols, personal notes and experience reports. Furthermore, reports on the application of telemedicine, AI and ML in pediatric resuscitation and outcome research, including translational technical research on devices and laboratory research.
 
The Topic is open to experts within pediatric emergency medicine, resuscitation and intensive care, pediatric prehospital emergency care, pediatric rehabilitation, pediatric cardiology, pediatric neurology and pediatric traumatology.

It is our hope that many programs can acquire this knowledge from this Open Access collection with Frontiers in Pediatrics.


Keywords: prehospital, emergency, resuscitation, critical care, cardiac arrest


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

22 February 2019 Abstract
24 May 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

22 February 2019 Abstract
24 May 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top
);