Research Topic

Analysing Psychosocial and Contextual Factors Underpinning Bullying and Cyberbullying

About this Research Topic

More than forty years of study on bullying have identified it as a public health problem, with serious academic and psychosocial consequences. The extensive literature defines it as an intentional phenomenon, repeated over time and immoral, which is sustained by the relational dominion-submission model established between victims and aggressors, and is maintained due to the attitude and lack of reaction of bystanders. These patterns of risk relationships have been broadened and diversified through the use of information and communication technologies (ICT), giving rise to what is commonly known as cyberbullying.

Although its multicausal nature and its negative effects on the well-being of those who suffer bullying and cyberbullying are clearly identified, high levels of involvement still remain. Moreover, in the study of bullying and cyberbullying, it is important to examine the implication of cognitive, social and moral competencies, which young people display in interpersonal situations, and which denote aspects of their social personality. In addition, other contextual dimensions, such as social status, group norms or school climate have been identified as elements that would increase the risk of school children being victims or aggressors, or reduce the possibility of such behaviors reoccurring.

The aim of this Research Topic is to analyse how the interactive dynamics between psychological and contextual factors relate to bullying and cyberbullying. Our main focus is individual and contextual characteristics, particularly how these are understood either as risk factors or as consequences of the involvement in bullying and cyberbullying. Moreover, the understanding of such complex phenomena requires that we address the globally different factors of influence identified by the scientific literature, through a methodological design that allows one to observe the psychosocial, moral, motivational and emotional elements and the peer context characteristics. We also welcome contributions from diverse cultures, including non-western and global south contexts.

The scope of this Research Topic is to reach an updated body of knowledge that provides relevant information for the identification of the conditions that cause or occur in bullying and cyberbullying and that interfere with well-being of school children. We are seeking empirical and theoretical (mainly meta-analysis) that guide the design of effective intervention programs with this population.


Keywords: Peer Group, Bullying, Cyberbullying, Psychosocial Risks, Norms


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

More than forty years of study on bullying have identified it as a public health problem, with serious academic and psychosocial consequences. The extensive literature defines it as an intentional phenomenon, repeated over time and immoral, which is sustained by the relational dominion-submission model established between victims and aggressors, and is maintained due to the attitude and lack of reaction of bystanders. These patterns of risk relationships have been broadened and diversified through the use of information and communication technologies (ICT), giving rise to what is commonly known as cyberbullying.

Although its multicausal nature and its negative effects on the well-being of those who suffer bullying and cyberbullying are clearly identified, high levels of involvement still remain. Moreover, in the study of bullying and cyberbullying, it is important to examine the implication of cognitive, social and moral competencies, which young people display in interpersonal situations, and which denote aspects of their social personality. In addition, other contextual dimensions, such as social status, group norms or school climate have been identified as elements that would increase the risk of school children being victims or aggressors, or reduce the possibility of such behaviors reoccurring.

The aim of this Research Topic is to analyse how the interactive dynamics between psychological and contextual factors relate to bullying and cyberbullying. Our main focus is individual and contextual characteristics, particularly how these are understood either as risk factors or as consequences of the involvement in bullying and cyberbullying. Moreover, the understanding of such complex phenomena requires that we address the globally different factors of influence identified by the scientific literature, through a methodological design that allows one to observe the psychosocial, moral, motivational and emotional elements and the peer context characteristics. We also welcome contributions from diverse cultures, including non-western and global south contexts.

The scope of this Research Topic is to reach an updated body of knowledge that provides relevant information for the identification of the conditions that cause or occur in bullying and cyberbullying and that interfere with well-being of school children. We are seeking empirical and theoretical (mainly meta-analysis) that guide the design of effective intervention programs with this population.


Keywords: Peer Group, Bullying, Cyberbullying, Psychosocial Risks, Norms


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

28 February 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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