Research Topic

Smart Biopolymer Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications

About this Research Topic

The status quo definition of biopolymers defines them as “polymers intended to interface with biological systems to evaluate, treat, augment or replace any tissue, organ, or body function.” Biopolymers offer dazzling properties such as high porosity with controllable pore size, biodegradability, biocompatibility, versatility in chemistry, as well as great design flexibility that make them appropriate for various biomedical applications.

One of the most common applications of biopolymers in medicine is their employment as scaffolding materials in order to encourage regeneration of a target tissue. Scaffolds are defined as three-dimensional porous solid biomaterials designed to perform some or all of the following functions:

 (i) promote cell-biomaterial interactions, cell adhesion, and ECM deposition,
 (ii) permit sufficient transport of gases, nutrients, and regulatory factors to allow cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation,
 (iii) biodegrade at a controllable rate that approximates the rate of tissue regeneration under the culture conditions of interest, and
 (iv) induce a minimal degree of inflammation or toxicity in vivo.

In addition, smart biopolymers are traditionally defined as biopolymers that can undergo a rapid change in dimension or physical properties, instigated by a variety of stimuli ranging from temperature or pH change to electromagnetic waves, ultrasound, visible-, or infrared (IR)- and near infrared (NIR)-light.

This Research Topic welcomes discussions related to the characterization, fabrication, and application of smart biopolymeric materials for tissue engineering, including the following:

 • 3D-designed scaffolds to support cell proliferation and differentiation both in-vitro or in-vivo
 • Delivery of bioactive substances (such as growth factors) to induce tissue growth
 • Drug loaded biopolymers scaffolds for localized drug delivery system


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The status quo definition of biopolymers defines them as “polymers intended to interface with biological systems to evaluate, treat, augment or replace any tissue, organ, or body function.” Biopolymers offer dazzling properties such as high porosity with controllable pore size, biodegradability, biocompatibility, versatility in chemistry, as well as great design flexibility that make them appropriate for various biomedical applications.

One of the most common applications of biopolymers in medicine is their employment as scaffolding materials in order to encourage regeneration of a target tissue. Scaffolds are defined as three-dimensional porous solid biomaterials designed to perform some or all of the following functions:

 (i) promote cell-biomaterial interactions, cell adhesion, and ECM deposition,
 (ii) permit sufficient transport of gases, nutrients, and regulatory factors to allow cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation,
 (iii) biodegrade at a controllable rate that approximates the rate of tissue regeneration under the culture conditions of interest, and
 (iv) induce a minimal degree of inflammation or toxicity in vivo.

In addition, smart biopolymers are traditionally defined as biopolymers that can undergo a rapid change in dimension or physical properties, instigated by a variety of stimuli ranging from temperature or pH change to electromagnetic waves, ultrasound, visible-, or infrared (IR)- and near infrared (NIR)-light.

This Research Topic welcomes discussions related to the characterization, fabrication, and application of smart biopolymeric materials for tissue engineering, including the following:

 • 3D-designed scaffolds to support cell proliferation and differentiation both in-vitro or in-vivo
 • Delivery of bioactive substances (such as growth factors) to induce tissue growth
 • Drug loaded biopolymers scaffolds for localized drug delivery system


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

19 October 2018 Abstract
18 January 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

19 October 2018 Abstract
18 January 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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