Research Topic

Defect and Electronic Structures of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite for Solar Cell Application

About this Research Topic

Recently, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the US has announced a new world record of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (OHP) based solar-cell. The PCE was 22.7 %, with significant competition with CdTe (22.1 %), CIGS (22.6 %), and Si (25.4 %). (In the case of a perovskite/silicon tandem solar-cell, a 25.2% PCE was recently published.) The fast development, only nine years, was surprising, and now this OHP is becoming a compelling candidate to replace the current commercial material, silicon. Many researchers are thinking about the end of the PCE race and need now to focus more on a fundamental viewpoint. Until now, the research goal in OHP-based solar-cells was pretty clear: “to make an OHP-based solar-cell with easy fabrication, high PCE, and stable performance.” The result of this goal looks very successful now.

Understanding of defect structure in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials is a crucial point to explain several physical properties such as material stability, energy band, carrier mobility, and so on. In solar-cell application using organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials, in particular, it is essential to make a more advanced device with high efficiency and stability. This research viewpoint is standard on semiconductor industrials, and we already used defect effects such as n-/p-type doping to control the carriers by adding a donor or acceptor level in the bandgap. Also, we expect the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite-based solar cell to be improved further after this defect study.

In this Research Topic, we are focusing on the kind of defect, the roles/effects of the defect, how to control/remove defects, and the positive/negative aspects to solar-cell application. Finally, we would like to suggest fundamental defect structure as a field of study for future research on organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials.

All article types are accepted.


Keywords: defect structure, electronic structure, organic-inorganic hybrid perovksite, solar cell, thin film, atomic structure, atomic/electronic structure


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recently, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the US has announced a new world record of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (OHP) based solar-cell. The PCE was 22.7 %, with significant competition with CdTe (22.1 %), CIGS (22.6 %), and Si (25.4 %). (In the case of a perovskite/silicon tandem solar-cell, a 25.2% PCE was recently published.) The fast development, only nine years, was surprising, and now this OHP is becoming a compelling candidate to replace the current commercial material, silicon. Many researchers are thinking about the end of the PCE race and need now to focus more on a fundamental viewpoint. Until now, the research goal in OHP-based solar-cells was pretty clear: “to make an OHP-based solar-cell with easy fabrication, high PCE, and stable performance.” The result of this goal looks very successful now.

Understanding of defect structure in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials is a crucial point to explain several physical properties such as material stability, energy band, carrier mobility, and so on. In solar-cell application using organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials, in particular, it is essential to make a more advanced device with high efficiency and stability. This research viewpoint is standard on semiconductor industrials, and we already used defect effects such as n-/p-type doping to control the carriers by adding a donor or acceptor level in the bandgap. Also, we expect the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite-based solar cell to be improved further after this defect study.

In this Research Topic, we are focusing on the kind of defect, the roles/effects of the defect, how to control/remove defects, and the positive/negative aspects to solar-cell application. Finally, we would like to suggest fundamental defect structure as a field of study for future research on organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials.

All article types are accepted.


Keywords: defect structure, electronic structure, organic-inorganic hybrid perovksite, solar cell, thin film, atomic structure, atomic/electronic structure


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 October 2018 Abstract
28 January 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 October 2018 Abstract
28 January 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top
);