Research Topic

High-Capacity and Stable Anode Materials in Solid-state batteries

About this Research Topic

Recently, scientists and engineers in academic institutions and industry worldwide have devoted much effort to develop the ultimate solution to safety issues arising from the flammable organic electrolytes of rechargeable Li-ion batteries. Thus, all-solid-state rechargeable Li-ion batteries that employ non-flammable inorganic solid electrolytes instead of the currently used organics have been developed. Batteries for powering electric vehicles (EVs) require much larger energy storage capabilities than those for portable devices and can cause more serious problems if they fail. All-solid-state rechargeable Li-ion batteries are considered to achieve higher energy densities than those using organic liquid systems in the existing commercial batteries owing to their simplified structure. Traditional intercalation electrode materials, such as LiCoO2, LiMn2O4, LiFePO4, LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, and graphite, can deliver very limited reversible capacities, which fail to meet the energy storage requirements for powering EVs, especially for long cruising distances of over 500 km on a single charge. One of the challenges in high-performance all-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries is the development of stable high-capacity anode materials. As Si alloy and Li metal have the top two theoretical gravimetric and volumetric Li storage capacities as well as very low operation potentials, they are the optimal options for the anode material.

Thus, the first aim of this Research Topic is to compile the latest experimental and theoretical research findings on applications of stable, Si alloy and/or Li metal anodes in all-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries in terms of the materials and surface/interfacial designs for enhancement of the chemical/electrochemical and/or mechanical properties. The second aim is to demonstrate that these high-capacity anodes can be used in all-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries in the near future. Although the focus of this Topic is on studies with Si alloy and Li metal anodes in inorganic solid electrolytes, we also welcome contributions with other high-capacity anode materials if those lead to a better understanding of performances of Si/Li anodes in all-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries.
Manuscripts can be of the following types: Original Research; Technical Notes; Perspective; Review.


Topic editor Dr. Bong-Chull Kim is employed by EoCell Inc., USA. All other topic editors declare no competing interests with regards to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Si alloy, Li metal, Inorganic solid electrolytes, Cycling stability, All-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recently, scientists and engineers in academic institutions and industry worldwide have devoted much effort to develop the ultimate solution to safety issues arising from the flammable organic electrolytes of rechargeable Li-ion batteries. Thus, all-solid-state rechargeable Li-ion batteries that employ non-flammable inorganic solid electrolytes instead of the currently used organics have been developed. Batteries for powering electric vehicles (EVs) require much larger energy storage capabilities than those for portable devices and can cause more serious problems if they fail. All-solid-state rechargeable Li-ion batteries are considered to achieve higher energy densities than those using organic liquid systems in the existing commercial batteries owing to their simplified structure. Traditional intercalation electrode materials, such as LiCoO2, LiMn2O4, LiFePO4, LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, and graphite, can deliver very limited reversible capacities, which fail to meet the energy storage requirements for powering EVs, especially for long cruising distances of over 500 km on a single charge. One of the challenges in high-performance all-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries is the development of stable high-capacity anode materials. As Si alloy and Li metal have the top two theoretical gravimetric and volumetric Li storage capacities as well as very low operation potentials, they are the optimal options for the anode material.

Thus, the first aim of this Research Topic is to compile the latest experimental and theoretical research findings on applications of stable, Si alloy and/or Li metal anodes in all-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries in terms of the materials and surface/interfacial designs for enhancement of the chemical/electrochemical and/or mechanical properties. The second aim is to demonstrate that these high-capacity anodes can be used in all-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries in the near future. Although the focus of this Topic is on studies with Si alloy and Li metal anodes in inorganic solid electrolytes, we also welcome contributions with other high-capacity anode materials if those lead to a better understanding of performances of Si/Li anodes in all-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries.
Manuscripts can be of the following types: Original Research; Technical Notes; Perspective; Review.


Topic editor Dr. Bong-Chull Kim is employed by EoCell Inc., USA. All other topic editors declare no competing interests with regards to the Research Topic subject.


Keywords: Si alloy, Li metal, Inorganic solid electrolytes, Cycling stability, All-solid-state rechargeable Li batteries


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

27 October 2018 Abstract
24 February 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

27 October 2018 Abstract
24 February 2019 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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