Research Topic

Forest Fire Emissions and Atmospheric Composition

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About this Research Topic

Forest fire emissions are a significant source of carbon dioxide (CO2), not only affecting its interannual variability but also biogeochemical cycles with consequences for climate. Carbon monoxide, released by incomplete combustion and with an atmospheric lifetime of a few months, influences the atmospheric composition on the regional and global scale, through depletion of the main atmospheric oxidant, the OH radical. Nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and black carbon (BC – component of light absorbing aerosols) can produce tropospheric ozone and particles, thus contributing to air pollution and climate effects. At the same time, aerobic soils may act as a sink for other important greenhouse gas such as methane (CH4), and fire might even increase the uptake of CH4 on these soils. Therefore, forest fire activity strongly affects air pollution, atmospheric composition and climate. Climate change also effects forest fires, as high temperatures and extensive drought have an impact on the flammability of vegetation. Predictions show that fire seasons will be more severe in the future, posing a serious threat to ecosystems and human society. Although efforts have been conducted over the past years to assess the impact of forest fires through observational and modelling approaches, more insights are needed in order to understand their effects and develop strategies to mitigate them.

This Research Topic welcomes articles focusing on gaseous and aerosols forest fires emissions and their implications on a regional and global scale in terms of biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry and climate.


Keywords: Forest fires, Biogeochemical cycles, Carbon dioxide, Carbon monoxide, Atmospheric composition, Atmosphere, OH radical, VOCs, Black carbon, Air pollution, Climate effects, Climate change, Methane, Fire, High temperature, Drought, Future threat


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Forest fire emissions are a significant source of carbon dioxide (CO2), not only affecting its interannual variability but also biogeochemical cycles with consequences for climate. Carbon monoxide, released by incomplete combustion and with an atmospheric lifetime of a few months, influences the atmospheric composition on the regional and global scale, through depletion of the main atmospheric oxidant, the OH radical. Nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and black carbon (BC – component of light absorbing aerosols) can produce tropospheric ozone and particles, thus contributing to air pollution and climate effects. At the same time, aerobic soils may act as a sink for other important greenhouse gas such as methane (CH4), and fire might even increase the uptake of CH4 on these soils. Therefore, forest fire activity strongly affects air pollution, atmospheric composition and climate. Climate change also effects forest fires, as high temperatures and extensive drought have an impact on the flammability of vegetation. Predictions show that fire seasons will be more severe in the future, posing a serious threat to ecosystems and human society. Although efforts have been conducted over the past years to assess the impact of forest fires through observational and modelling approaches, more insights are needed in order to understand their effects and develop strategies to mitigate them.

This Research Topic welcomes articles focusing on gaseous and aerosols forest fires emissions and their implications on a regional and global scale in terms of biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry and climate.


Keywords: Forest fires, Biogeochemical cycles, Carbon dioxide, Carbon monoxide, Atmospheric composition, Atmosphere, OH radical, VOCs, Black carbon, Air pollution, Climate effects, Climate change, Methane, Fire, High temperature, Drought, Future threat


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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