Research Topic

Assessment and Treatment of Dysphagia: From the Rheology to the Clinics

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About this Research Topic

In the last decade, the increasing interest in the nutritional aspects of patients as well as the finding that a high number of deaths resulting from cerebral and neuromotor vasculopathies, attributable to swallowing disorders, has favoured the development and evolution of deglutology and of speech therapy as well as the diffusion in neurology, and in oncology of artificial nutrition and feeding modalities with texture modified foods for patients suffering from dysphagia. Dysphagia is a swallowing disorder characterized by the difficulty in transferring solid foods and/or liquids from the oral cavity to the stomach, impairing autonomous, and safe oral feeding. The main problems deriving from dysphagia are tracheo-bronchial aspiration, aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition and dehydration.

Dysphagia is a symptom that has a high prevalence in both internal and surgical fields. As a matter of fact, at least 45% of subjects over 75 years have symptoms related to dysphagia and approximately 12-13% of hospitalized patients are dysphagic, as well as 66% of those hospitalized in the long term. Dysphagia is also present, to a lesser extent, in head and neck cancer, upper GI tract cancer (esophagus) and in the after-effects of functional head and neck surgery. From the nutritional point of view, the difficulty or the impossibility to swallow leads to an impaired spontaneous feeding behaviour (hypophagia) accompanied by progressive body weight loss, nutrients deficiency, a condition known as protein-energy malnutrition. Moreover, dysphagia is often associated with penetration or aspiration resulting in ab ingestis bronchopneumonia.

This Research Topic dedicated to dysphagia aims to shed light on this disorder providing clinicians with guidelines to both diagnose the disease and put in place personalized therapies taking into account
i) The specific type of dysphagia,
ii) The physiological state of the patient,
iii) The food technology and the rheological-physical characteristics of food.

Therefore, we appreciate contributions focused on dysphagia in its many aspects related to physics, engineering, biological, clinical, nutrition, quality of life correlated with dysphagia.


Keywords: Dysphagia, Nutrition, Rheology, Hypophagia, Diet


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In the last decade, the increasing interest in the nutritional aspects of patients as well as the finding that a high number of deaths resulting from cerebral and neuromotor vasculopathies, attributable to swallowing disorders, has favoured the development and evolution of deglutology and of speech therapy as well as the diffusion in neurology, and in oncology of artificial nutrition and feeding modalities with texture modified foods for patients suffering from dysphagia. Dysphagia is a swallowing disorder characterized by the difficulty in transferring solid foods and/or liquids from the oral cavity to the stomach, impairing autonomous, and safe oral feeding. The main problems deriving from dysphagia are tracheo-bronchial aspiration, aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition and dehydration.

Dysphagia is a symptom that has a high prevalence in both internal and surgical fields. As a matter of fact, at least 45% of subjects over 75 years have symptoms related to dysphagia and approximately 12-13% of hospitalized patients are dysphagic, as well as 66% of those hospitalized in the long term. Dysphagia is also present, to a lesser extent, in head and neck cancer, upper GI tract cancer (esophagus) and in the after-effects of functional head and neck surgery. From the nutritional point of view, the difficulty or the impossibility to swallow leads to an impaired spontaneous feeding behaviour (hypophagia) accompanied by progressive body weight loss, nutrients deficiency, a condition known as protein-energy malnutrition. Moreover, dysphagia is often associated with penetration or aspiration resulting in ab ingestis bronchopneumonia.

This Research Topic dedicated to dysphagia aims to shed light on this disorder providing clinicians with guidelines to both diagnose the disease and put in place personalized therapies taking into account
i) The specific type of dysphagia,
ii) The physiological state of the patient,
iii) The food technology and the rheological-physical characteristics of food.

Therefore, we appreciate contributions focused on dysphagia in its many aspects related to physics, engineering, biological, clinical, nutrition, quality of life correlated with dysphagia.


Keywords: Dysphagia, Nutrition, Rheology, Hypophagia, Diet


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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