Research Topic

Reproduction and the Inflammatory Response

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Inflammation is a defensive response of the body to stimulation, manifested by redness, swelling, fever, pain and dysfunction. Systemic inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiological process that induces multi-organ injury and causes serious human diseases, including tumors, autoimmune diseases, etc. ...

Inflammation is a defensive response of the body to stimulation, manifested by redness, swelling, fever, pain and dysfunction. Systemic inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiological process that induces multi-organ injury and causes serious human diseases, including tumors, autoimmune diseases, etc. However, in the reproductive process, the role of inflammation has not been fully revealed, which requires in-depth exploration.

Reproduction refers to the physiological process in which organisms produce offspring for the continuation of races, that is, the process in which organisms produce new individuals. In this process, it involves a series of complex physiological processes, such as the development of germ cells, maturation and the combination of male and female germ cells, embryonic development, implantation, pregnancy establishment and maintenance. The role of inflammation in this process has been reported, including ovulation, pregnancy and other important reproductive processes. Inflammatory factors have special expression patterns. Therefore, inflammation plays an important regulatory role in the reproductive process.

Inflammation not only exists in the physiological process of reproduction, but also has been considered as a potential important factor affecting reproduction in a pathological process. In women, PCOS and POF have been shown to be immune-related, leading to abnormal germ cell development and infertility, while in men, immune factors such as sperm antibodies can also induce male infertility. Even in the process of pregnancy establishment, immune system disorders can also lead to pregnancy failure and other phenomena. Therefore, it is helpful to improve women's reproductive health to fully understand the regulation and influence of immunity on reproduction.

Inflammasomes is a protein complex that consists of NOD-like receptor (NLR), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), and Caspase. In inflammasomes, NLR is located in the cytoplasm and belongs to a kind of pattern recognition receptor. Depending on the difference of N-terminal ending, the sub-family of NLR that contains the Pyrin ending is called NPRP, which is one of the largest NLR. NLRP is also closely related to oxidative stress, metabolism, insulin. These are also the key factors in inducing infertility.

The goal of this Research Topic is to bring the knowledge about the role of inflammasomes in reproduction. It should highlight the biological function and molecular mechanism of inflammasomes in the physiology and pathology of reproduction. It also aims to generate curiosity and raise questions to the therapy of infertility from the viewpoint of inflammation. These enquiries, in the form of Original research, Reviews, and Commentary articles - by highlighting the gaps in current knowledge; so that it may form the basis of future research.


Keywords: Inflammasomes, infertility, NLRP, germ cell, embryo development, pregnancy


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