Research Topic

New Insights into Vascular Language Disorders

About this Research Topic

Aphasia is an acquired language disorder affecting oral and written language comprehension and/or production. It is an important source of handicap and has a great impact on the quality of life of impaired people and their proxies. Aphasia results from brain injury, whether in the context of focal damage (i.e. stroke) or neurodegenerative disease.

Aphasia knowledge has first relied on the seminal clinical-anatomical works describing the “zone du langage” and attached bundles. The understanding of the topic has more recently developed thanks to advances in the field of neuroscience, linguistics, neuropsychology, and clinical practice. Thus, at present, aphasia is conceptualized as a disruption of specific cognitive processes and language operations.

Moreover, a better characterization of the underpinnings of aphasia and its recovery is now possible, thanks to the development of computerized models of language processing and model-based language interventions, combined with neuroimaging techniques and methods (i.e. structural and functional MRI, functional connectivity analysis, EEG), as well as neuromodulation approaches.

This Research Topic aims to highlight current perspectives on the understanding of brain reorganization and remodeling in the context of aphasia. In particular, it will focus on therapy-induced neuroplasticity in aphasia, and principles of recovery. We welcome articles that deepen our understanding of the anatomic-functional basis of aphasia, its recovery and neural circuitry remodeling that can ultimately improve treatments for aphasia.


Keywords: Aphasia, Language, Stroke, Plasticity, Computational


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Aphasia is an acquired language disorder affecting oral and written language comprehension and/or production. It is an important source of handicap and has a great impact on the quality of life of impaired people and their proxies. Aphasia results from brain injury, whether in the context of focal damage (i.e. stroke) or neurodegenerative disease.

Aphasia knowledge has first relied on the seminal clinical-anatomical works describing the “zone du langage” and attached bundles. The understanding of the topic has more recently developed thanks to advances in the field of neuroscience, linguistics, neuropsychology, and clinical practice. Thus, at present, aphasia is conceptualized as a disruption of specific cognitive processes and language operations.

Moreover, a better characterization of the underpinnings of aphasia and its recovery is now possible, thanks to the development of computerized models of language processing and model-based language interventions, combined with neuroimaging techniques and methods (i.e. structural and functional MRI, functional connectivity analysis, EEG), as well as neuromodulation approaches.

This Research Topic aims to highlight current perspectives on the understanding of brain reorganization and remodeling in the context of aphasia. In particular, it will focus on therapy-induced neuroplasticity in aphasia, and principles of recovery. We welcome articles that deepen our understanding of the anatomic-functional basis of aphasia, its recovery and neural circuitry remodeling that can ultimately improve treatments for aphasia.


Keywords: Aphasia, Language, Stroke, Plasticity, Computational


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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