Research Topic

Neuromodulatory Function in Auditory Processing

About this Research Topic

The vertebrate auditory pathway has been among the most fruitful neural substrates to investigate the function of a number of neural features in light of their computational role. For example, the specialized Calyx of Held synapse in the auditory brain stem has provided fundamental insights into physiological mechanisms common to all excitatory synapses. Additionally, the discretely segregated inhibitory nuclei of the auditory system have allowed inhibitory influences on neural computation to be independently manipulated, an experimental luxury not available in many regions of the brain.

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the study of synaptic influences beyond the principal excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters toward neuromodulation. Modulatory neurotransmitter systems that convey cholinergic, serotonergic, or dopaminergic signals pervade the auditory pathway, but remain poorly understood. Other molecules like BDNF, nitric oxide, urocortins, or zinc have only recently been shown to modulate auditory processing. The increased use of targeted optogenetic or pharmacogenetic tools and studies involving awake behaving animals provide new opportunities to explore the role of these systems, particularly in the auditory system where neural computations can be investigated in a readily controlled functional context.

This Research Topic aims to do the following;
1) Provide a forum to accommodate the increasing volume of work that focuses on the emerging influence of modulatory circuitry on the auditory pathway;
2) Highlight this important growing field of inquiry that comes from the synergistic efforts of several laboratories presenting work in a compilation format;
3) Provide opportunities for review manuscripts that can contextualize this work in the broader fields of auditory neuroscience and/or neuromodulation.

We welcome papers that investigate neuromodulation at any level of the auditory pathway from the periphery to cortex. Of particular interest are studies involving patch clamp physiology, in vivo electrophysiology, neuroanatomy, and behavior.

We prefer the following submission types, but will entertain suggestions from interested authors for other article types: Original Research, Brief Research Report, Methods, Mini Review, and Review.


Keywords: Auditory processing, neuromodulation, G-protein coupled receptors, neuronal adaptation, efferent feedback mechanisms


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The vertebrate auditory pathway has been among the most fruitful neural substrates to investigate the function of a number of neural features in light of their computational role. For example, the specialized Calyx of Held synapse in the auditory brain stem has provided fundamental insights into physiological mechanisms common to all excitatory synapses. Additionally, the discretely segregated inhibitory nuclei of the auditory system have allowed inhibitory influences on neural computation to be independently manipulated, an experimental luxury not available in many regions of the brain.

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the study of synaptic influences beyond the principal excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters toward neuromodulation. Modulatory neurotransmitter systems that convey cholinergic, serotonergic, or dopaminergic signals pervade the auditory pathway, but remain poorly understood. Other molecules like BDNF, nitric oxide, urocortins, or zinc have only recently been shown to modulate auditory processing. The increased use of targeted optogenetic or pharmacogenetic tools and studies involving awake behaving animals provide new opportunities to explore the role of these systems, particularly in the auditory system where neural computations can be investigated in a readily controlled functional context.

This Research Topic aims to do the following;
1) Provide a forum to accommodate the increasing volume of work that focuses on the emerging influence of modulatory circuitry on the auditory pathway;
2) Highlight this important growing field of inquiry that comes from the synergistic efforts of several laboratories presenting work in a compilation format;
3) Provide opportunities for review manuscripts that can contextualize this work in the broader fields of auditory neuroscience and/or neuromodulation.

We welcome papers that investigate neuromodulation at any level of the auditory pathway from the periphery to cortex. Of particular interest are studies involving patch clamp physiology, in vivo electrophysiology, neuroanatomy, and behavior.

We prefer the following submission types, but will entertain suggestions from interested authors for other article types: Original Research, Brief Research Report, Methods, Mini Review, and Review.


Keywords: Auditory processing, neuromodulation, G-protein coupled receptors, neuronal adaptation, efferent feedback mechanisms


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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