Research Topic

Defects in Regulation: How, Where and When The Immune System Can Go Wrong

About this Research Topic

The immune system is a highly complex cellular and molecular machinery, which requires strict regulation and guidance to prevent it from going wrong. How, where and when can the immune system go wrong?

A pivotal role is played by the balance between activated effector T cells, B and regulatory T cells in keeping the level of immune/inflammatory response in a physiological state. The alteration between effector and regulatory cells contributes to diseases.

Defective expression of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, which prevents thymic transcription of tissue-specific self-antigens, disables the proper sense of self and results in self-destruction. Uncontrolled proliferation of immune cells may result in immunoproliferative diseases, such as leukemia. A compromised immune response leads to immunodeficiencies including the periodic fever syndromes. Finally, overactivation of the immune system may result in autoimmune diseases or allergies such as peanut allergy.

All the above conditions are examples of where the immune system could go wrong.

The aim of this Research Topic is to provide further insight into the relationship between physiological functions of the immune system and the failure of regulatory mechanisms leading to immunodeficiency (specifically AIRE deficiency and lazy leukocyte syndrome), autoimmunity with a focus on autoinflammation, and the molecular basis for an allergic reaction.

We welcome the submission of Original Research, Review, Opinion, and Perspective articles on the following themes:

1. Defects in regulatory mechanisms within the immune system such as AIRE deficiency and lazy leukocyte syndrome
2. Periodic fever syndrome and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated period syndrome with uncontrolled activation of innate immune cells.
3. The mechanisms of uncontrolled responses of the immune system in peanut allergy
4. Immunotherapeutic interventions, either existing or to be developed, to prevent or treat the defects of the immune system as specified above.


Keywords: immunoregulation, immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, allergy, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The immune system is a highly complex cellular and molecular machinery, which requires strict regulation and guidance to prevent it from going wrong. How, where and when can the immune system go wrong?

A pivotal role is played by the balance between activated effector T cells, B and regulatory T cells in keeping the level of immune/inflammatory response in a physiological state. The alteration between effector and regulatory cells contributes to diseases.

Defective expression of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, which prevents thymic transcription of tissue-specific self-antigens, disables the proper sense of self and results in self-destruction. Uncontrolled proliferation of immune cells may result in immunoproliferative diseases, such as leukemia. A compromised immune response leads to immunodeficiencies including the periodic fever syndromes. Finally, overactivation of the immune system may result in autoimmune diseases or allergies such as peanut allergy.

All the above conditions are examples of where the immune system could go wrong.

The aim of this Research Topic is to provide further insight into the relationship between physiological functions of the immune system and the failure of regulatory mechanisms leading to immunodeficiency (specifically AIRE deficiency and lazy leukocyte syndrome), autoimmunity with a focus on autoinflammation, and the molecular basis for an allergic reaction.

We welcome the submission of Original Research, Review, Opinion, and Perspective articles on the following themes:

1. Defects in regulatory mechanisms within the immune system such as AIRE deficiency and lazy leukocyte syndrome
2. Periodic fever syndrome and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated period syndrome with uncontrolled activation of innate immune cells.
3. The mechanisms of uncontrolled responses of the immune system in peanut allergy
4. Immunotherapeutic interventions, either existing or to be developed, to prevent or treat the defects of the immune system as specified above.


Keywords: immunoregulation, immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, allergy, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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