Research Topic

Silviculture and Agriculture Tree Growth Under Water Stress

About this Research Topic

Water scarcity in certain regions of the planet, together with an unprecedented rise in population, presents a great challenge to silviculture and agriculture associated productivity, such as for food and timber production. The increased utilization of these products can be restricted by the scarcity of natural resources, such as water. Maintaining sustainable plant growth is the key to optimizing productivity. However, we do not yet completely understand the associated mechanisms of plant growth and how they are affected by water stress.

In recent years, there has been an interesting debate on the relative importance of the limitation of growth by photosynthesis and hydraulic-related signals (e.g. turgor). Meanwhile, this knowledge has been used to develop increasingly more mechanistic-based growth models. However, there are still many open questions, such as what is the main controlling factor of plant growth rate under drought conditions, is it turgor and associated processes or photosynthesis? Which one has a more immediate effect? Moreover, can hydraulic traits related to turgor explain tree growth? Do different tree organs (e.g., leaves, stems, roots and fruits) respond to water stress differently? How can we incorporate turgor related processes in the already existing growth models, that are more photosynthesis-focused, in a mechanistic way? And, finally, are there any reliable indicators providing information on water stress that can help to make predictions on plant growth and crop productivity?

This Research Topic invites submissions linking tree growth with water stress responses, and adaptations from molecular to crop-stand scales, both in agricultural and plantations systems. We especially encourage research approaches and data that combine plant water relations, carbon fluxes, and growth of different plant organs. This will allow us to identify growth limitations as well as the different levels of stress at which they occur. We also welcome modelling studies that increase our mechanistic understanding of growth and its response and adaptation to water stress. We expect to bring together contributions at the crossroads of plant ecophysiology, forestry, silviculture, agronomy, soil, and atmospheric sciences to provide novel and more mechanistic approaches to improve tree plantation and crop production in the context of climate change.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Water scarcity in certain regions of the planet, together with an unprecedented rise in population, presents a great challenge to silviculture and agriculture associated productivity, such as for food and timber production. The increased utilization of these products can be restricted by the scarcity of natural resources, such as water. Maintaining sustainable plant growth is the key to optimizing productivity. However, we do not yet completely understand the associated mechanisms of plant growth and how they are affected by water stress.

In recent years, there has been an interesting debate on the relative importance of the limitation of growth by photosynthesis and hydraulic-related signals (e.g. turgor). Meanwhile, this knowledge has been used to develop increasingly more mechanistic-based growth models. However, there are still many open questions, such as what is the main controlling factor of plant growth rate under drought conditions, is it turgor and associated processes or photosynthesis? Which one has a more immediate effect? Moreover, can hydraulic traits related to turgor explain tree growth? Do different tree organs (e.g., leaves, stems, roots and fruits) respond to water stress differently? How can we incorporate turgor related processes in the already existing growth models, that are more photosynthesis-focused, in a mechanistic way? And, finally, are there any reliable indicators providing information on water stress that can help to make predictions on plant growth and crop productivity?

This Research Topic invites submissions linking tree growth with water stress responses, and adaptations from molecular to crop-stand scales, both in agricultural and plantations systems. We especially encourage research approaches and data that combine plant water relations, carbon fluxes, and growth of different plant organs. This will allow us to identify growth limitations as well as the different levels of stress at which they occur. We also welcome modelling studies that increase our mechanistic understanding of growth and its response and adaptation to water stress. We expect to bring together contributions at the crossroads of plant ecophysiology, forestry, silviculture, agronomy, soil, and atmospheric sciences to provide novel and more mechanistic approaches to improve tree plantation and crop production in the context of climate change.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..