Research Topic

Presence and Daily Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors: How Can Human Life Change?

About this Research Topic

In the last 50 years, our environment has been subjected to dramatic changes, particularly from a chemical point of view. Exponential production increases of both organic and inorganic chemicals have changed the chemical scenario and presence of chemicals in the natural environment. Certain synthetic chemical compounds are xenobiotics, which may act at low concentrations as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). These may lead to imbalances in hormone homeostasis and clinical adverse health effects, lowering the individual’s quality of life. Thus, endocrine disruption, as a form of systemic toxicity, has become an increasing global health concern.

Humans are exposed daily to numerous chemicals which may act as EDCs by inhalation, ingestion, or contact. Daily exposure of the general population can principally occur through consumer products from various fields of industry – e.g. plastics, food contact materials, household chemistry, and cosmetics. Water or food, contaminated with specific chemicals (e.g. pesticides, heavy metals, etc.) may also contribute to the overall exposure of the general population by exposing them to a mixture of individual chemicals in very low concentrations.

Daily use of cosmetics products may also increase the quantity and quality of exogenous compounds which humans are exposed to. On 16th May 2019, the European Commission published a call for data on ingredients with potential endocrine-disrupting properties used in cosmetic products.
Growing evidence demonstrates that it is necessary to establish the EDC action of the compounds which humans are exposed to every day.

The goal of this Research Topic is to compile novel and recent information of physiologic and endocrine disruptor effects as a result of EDC exposure found in cosmetics, as well as to delve in the details of human health effects. Original research or review articles focused on the toxicological properties and hazard or risk of chemicals which may be present in food, final consumer products, or cosmetics. We are especially interested in the use of in vitro and volunteer studies (preferably for cosmetics) as well as in vivo data with respect to 3Rs strategy.


Keywords: Endocrine disrupting chemicals, daily exposure, personal care, cosmetics, food, water, animal models, in vitro tests


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In the last 50 years, our environment has been subjected to dramatic changes, particularly from a chemical point of view. Exponential production increases of both organic and inorganic chemicals have changed the chemical scenario and presence of chemicals in the natural environment. Certain synthetic chemical compounds are xenobiotics, which may act at low concentrations as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). These may lead to imbalances in hormone homeostasis and clinical adverse health effects, lowering the individual’s quality of life. Thus, endocrine disruption, as a form of systemic toxicity, has become an increasing global health concern.

Humans are exposed daily to numerous chemicals which may act as EDCs by inhalation, ingestion, or contact. Daily exposure of the general population can principally occur through consumer products from various fields of industry – e.g. plastics, food contact materials, household chemistry, and cosmetics. Water or food, contaminated with specific chemicals (e.g. pesticides, heavy metals, etc.) may also contribute to the overall exposure of the general population by exposing them to a mixture of individual chemicals in very low concentrations.

Daily use of cosmetics products may also increase the quantity and quality of exogenous compounds which humans are exposed to. On 16th May 2019, the European Commission published a call for data on ingredients with potential endocrine-disrupting properties used in cosmetic products.
Growing evidence demonstrates that it is necessary to establish the EDC action of the compounds which humans are exposed to every day.

The goal of this Research Topic is to compile novel and recent information of physiologic and endocrine disruptor effects as a result of EDC exposure found in cosmetics, as well as to delve in the details of human health effects. Original research or review articles focused on the toxicological properties and hazard or risk of chemicals which may be present in food, final consumer products, or cosmetics. We are especially interested in the use of in vitro and volunteer studies (preferably for cosmetics) as well as in vivo data with respect to 3Rs strategy.


Keywords: Endocrine disrupting chemicals, daily exposure, personal care, cosmetics, food, water, animal models, in vitro tests


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 July 2020 Abstract
19 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 July 2020 Abstract
19 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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