Research Topic

Understanding Urban Health Disparities: Family Planning Access and Use Among the Urban Poor in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

About this Research Topic

Globally, there is a continuous increase in urbanization, with estimates that around 70% of the world’s population will be urbanized by 2050. Much of this urban growth is projected to happen in Asia and Africa. Rapid urban growth exacts a heavy toll on health and social services that are often already severely constrained. Health indicators, when stratified by urban versus rural, often indicate an urban advantage in many respects. However, this dichotomy can mask intra-urban health disparities that may disproportionately affect people living in informal settlements and other vulnerable and marginalized groups.

Access to family planning services remains a public health challenge in many parts of the world. In 2019, 270 million women of reproductive age had an unmet need for contraception, with the highest numbers reaching 87 million in Southern Asia, 28 million in Eastern Asia, and 23 million in South-Eastern Asia. In Africa, this was highest in the Eastern region, with 22 million women having an unmet need for contraception. With rising urban populations, improving contraceptive access for all is critical to ensuring that populations live quality and healthy lives. Creating stronger linkages between urban planning and family planning is critical to ensuring that the right kind of resources are channeled towards meeting contraceptive needs and improving access to social services for the increasing number of urban residents.

This Research Topic will focus on exploring the disparities surrounding modern contraception access and use among people living in low- and middle-income countries, with a special focus on women living in urban, informal settlements. In addition, papers that seek to explore and understand linkages between family planning and urban planning from a policy perspective are also welcome. We welcome a broad range of contributions, including Original Research, Reviews, Commentaries, Study Protocols and Systematic Reviews.

Please note that Frontiers also offers a Fee Support Program, available to any authors seeking financial support. If you would like any further information about this, please get in touch with the Editorial Office at globalwomenshealth@frontiersin.org.


Keywords: urban health, urban poor, informal settlements, contraception, family planning, social services


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Globally, there is a continuous increase in urbanization, with estimates that around 70% of the world’s population will be urbanized by 2050. Much of this urban growth is projected to happen in Asia and Africa. Rapid urban growth exacts a heavy toll on health and social services that are often already severely constrained. Health indicators, when stratified by urban versus rural, often indicate an urban advantage in many respects. However, this dichotomy can mask intra-urban health disparities that may disproportionately affect people living in informal settlements and other vulnerable and marginalized groups.

Access to family planning services remains a public health challenge in many parts of the world. In 2019, 270 million women of reproductive age had an unmet need for contraception, with the highest numbers reaching 87 million in Southern Asia, 28 million in Eastern Asia, and 23 million in South-Eastern Asia. In Africa, this was highest in the Eastern region, with 22 million women having an unmet need for contraception. With rising urban populations, improving contraceptive access for all is critical to ensuring that populations live quality and healthy lives. Creating stronger linkages between urban planning and family planning is critical to ensuring that the right kind of resources are channeled towards meeting contraceptive needs and improving access to social services for the increasing number of urban residents.

This Research Topic will focus on exploring the disparities surrounding modern contraception access and use among people living in low- and middle-income countries, with a special focus on women living in urban, informal settlements. In addition, papers that seek to explore and understand linkages between family planning and urban planning from a policy perspective are also welcome. We welcome a broad range of contributions, including Original Research, Reviews, Commentaries, Study Protocols and Systematic Reviews.

Please note that Frontiers also offers a Fee Support Program, available to any authors seeking financial support. If you would like any further information about this, please get in touch with the Editorial Office at globalwomenshealth@frontiersin.org.


Keywords: urban health, urban poor, informal settlements, contraception, family planning, social services


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

05 October 2020 Abstract
19 January 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

05 October 2020 Abstract
19 January 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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