Research Topic

Mechanisms of ageing: from the first gene to systemic approaches

About this Research Topic

Almost 30 years ago, the first gene directly involved in the regulation of both health and lifespan was identified using the nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans, starting an entire field of research, genetics of aging. But the interest towards aging is probably as old as humanity and was approached by philosophers well before being investigated by hard and life sciences.
Aging can have various definitions, but they all are describing a time-dependant increasing risk of dying, associated with a loss of homeostatic maintenance and basic functions of an organism. We can separate pathological aging - i.e. neurodegenerative diseases, cancers, etc - from normal aging, without any detected pathologies.
The genome project raised more questions about the role of genes in metabolism and diseases, and the omics era has brought more questions regarding their role in ageing. The initial search for simple solutions and THE gene of longevity seems to have come to an end. Indeed, projects to understand the processes limiting our lifespan tend to be more systemic and rely on more global approaches, aimed at showing the interactions existing between multiple organs in the determination of lifespan, and more importantly, healthspan.
Recent data slowly reshape our understanding of ageing’s deep nature and its origin.
The Topic will include but is not be limited to the following:
• The building of the aging field
• The first longevity genes
• Genetic actors of aging, and their environmental inputs
• Model organisms in aging research
• Drugging aging
• Aging organs and age-related disease models including cancer, inflammation, neurodegeneration, insulin resistance, metabolism, gut microbiota and muscle degeneration.
• Aging theories and the Evolution of Aging


Keywords: Ageing, genome project, drugging aging, aging organs, age-related diseases, diseasemodels, evolution of aging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Almost 30 years ago, the first gene directly involved in the regulation of both health and lifespan was identified using the nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans, starting an entire field of research, genetics of aging. But the interest towards aging is probably as old as humanity and was approached by philosophers well before being investigated by hard and life sciences.
Aging can have various definitions, but they all are describing a time-dependant increasing risk of dying, associated with a loss of homeostatic maintenance and basic functions of an organism. We can separate pathological aging - i.e. neurodegenerative diseases, cancers, etc - from normal aging, without any detected pathologies.
The genome project raised more questions about the role of genes in metabolism and diseases, and the omics era has brought more questions regarding their role in ageing. The initial search for simple solutions and THE gene of longevity seems to have come to an end. Indeed, projects to understand the processes limiting our lifespan tend to be more systemic and rely on more global approaches, aimed at showing the interactions existing between multiple organs in the determination of lifespan, and more importantly, healthspan.
Recent data slowly reshape our understanding of ageing’s deep nature and its origin.
The Topic will include but is not be limited to the following:
• The building of the aging field
• The first longevity genes
• Genetic actors of aging, and their environmental inputs
• Model organisms in aging research
• Drugging aging
• Aging organs and age-related disease models including cancer, inflammation, neurodegeneration, insulin resistance, metabolism, gut microbiota and muscle degeneration.
• Aging theories and the Evolution of Aging


Keywords: Ageing, genome project, drugging aging, aging organs, age-related diseases, diseasemodels, evolution of aging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 November 2020 Abstract
16 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 November 2020 Abstract
16 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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