Research Topic

Early Origins of Psoriatic Arthritis

About this Research Topic

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting 1-3% of the general population. 10-30% of psoriasis patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), which is associated with structural damage, reduced quality of life, disability and mortality. Early detection of PsA can lead to better outcomes. However, it is still unclear which individual psoriasis patients develop PsA. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the early origins of PsA and to identify robust and validated biomarkers for early diagnosis in order to subsequently maximize the window of treatment opportunity and prevent disease progression. Contributions to this topic should cover all major challenges related to the early origins of PsA.

Once PsA is clinically evident, systemic inflammatory burdens are already present and structural musculoskeletal damage is irreversible. However, little is currently known about the early origins of PsA. Hence, a deeper understanding of the early phase of the disease is important to enable a better and more detailed risk stratification of psoriasis patients. This Research Topic aims to provide a comprehensive contribution to a better definition (i) of patients with psoriasis who are at increased risk of PsA progression and (ii) of genetic, environmental and immunological risk factors for the developing of PsA. Finally, this Research Topic allow for improved patient care of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis patients.

The aim of this current Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel research in the field of early Psoriatic Arthritis. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic include, but are not limited to:

• Definition of pathophysiological mechanisms of early psoriatic disease.
• Discovery and validation of key biomarkers of PsA development (clinical, genetic or soluble biomarkers).
• Providing better diagnostic tools for early PsA diagnosis.
• Improving imaging modalities for the early assessment and monitoring of PsA.
• Developing therapeutic strategies to intercept the transition from psoriasis to psoriatic arthritis.

Here, we accept Original Research (Full-length, Brief Research Report), Reviews (Mini-Review, Systematic Review), and Perspective studies that address the aforementioned issues.


Keywords: Early phase, Psoriatic Arthritis, Risk factors, Biomarker, Psoriasis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting 1-3% of the general population. 10-30% of psoriasis patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), which is associated with structural damage, reduced quality of life, disability and mortality. Early detection of PsA can lead to better outcomes. However, it is still unclear which individual psoriasis patients develop PsA. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the early origins of PsA and to identify robust and validated biomarkers for early diagnosis in order to subsequently maximize the window of treatment opportunity and prevent disease progression. Contributions to this topic should cover all major challenges related to the early origins of PsA.

Once PsA is clinically evident, systemic inflammatory burdens are already present and structural musculoskeletal damage is irreversible. However, little is currently known about the early origins of PsA. Hence, a deeper understanding of the early phase of the disease is important to enable a better and more detailed risk stratification of psoriasis patients. This Research Topic aims to provide a comprehensive contribution to a better definition (i) of patients with psoriasis who are at increased risk of PsA progression and (ii) of genetic, environmental and immunological risk factors for the developing of PsA. Finally, this Research Topic allow for improved patient care of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis patients.

The aim of this current Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel research in the field of early Psoriatic Arthritis. Areas to be covered in this Research Topic include, but are not limited to:

• Definition of pathophysiological mechanisms of early psoriatic disease.
• Discovery and validation of key biomarkers of PsA development (clinical, genetic or soluble biomarkers).
• Providing better diagnostic tools for early PsA diagnosis.
• Improving imaging modalities for the early assessment and monitoring of PsA.
• Developing therapeutic strategies to intercept the transition from psoriasis to psoriatic arthritis.

Here, we accept Original Research (Full-length, Brief Research Report), Reviews (Mini-Review, Systematic Review), and Perspective studies that address the aforementioned issues.


Keywords: Early phase, Psoriatic Arthritis, Risk factors, Biomarker, Psoriasis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

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Submission Deadlines

19 October 2020 Abstract
16 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

19 October 2020 Abstract
16 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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