Research Topic

Marine Pollution - Emerging Issues and Challenges

About this Research Topic

The Anthropocene era in which human influences dominate, has direct implications for scientific research on marine ecosystems. Anthropogenic stressors including chemical (e.g. metals, pesticides, pharmaceuticals), physical (e.g. microplastics, sediments, temperature) and biological (e.g. invasive species, eutrophication) are increasingly impacting on the biodiversity and functioning of marine species and habitats. Hence, it is important to determine how new technologies and methods can be used to monitor the interactions between these different human stressors.

Marine pollutants comprise a wide diversity of physical, chemical, and biological agents, that once above a certain threshold can induce negative effects. These pollutants originate from human activities and enter the marine environment through various pathways. There are many thousands of pollutants that have been added or created by human processes, and for most of which, the available knowledge is very scarce. Agriculture, coastal tourism and recreation, port and harbor activities, urban and industrial development, mining, fisheries, and aquaculture, are all sources of marine pollution. Despite the increasing volume of scientific literature addressing cumulative impacts, there is a huge gap in the knowledge on how different pressures may interact, what are their resulting effects, and what conservation and management decisions should be made to protect and restore marine ecosystems.

This Research Topic will consider all novel contributions to the field of marine pollution, including studies on, emerging issues, techniques and/or technologies for monitoring. Contributions can include original research articles, method developments and reviews. The aim is to develop a greater understanding of how different anthropogenic stressors can alter the marine systems, at scales ranging from individual species to entire habitats.


Keywords: man-made, species and habitat loss, monitoring techniques


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The Anthropocene era in which human influences dominate, has direct implications for scientific research on marine ecosystems. Anthropogenic stressors including chemical (e.g. metals, pesticides, pharmaceuticals), physical (e.g. microplastics, sediments, temperature) and biological (e.g. invasive species, eutrophication) are increasingly impacting on the biodiversity and functioning of marine species and habitats. Hence, it is important to determine how new technologies and methods can be used to monitor the interactions between these different human stressors.

Marine pollutants comprise a wide diversity of physical, chemical, and biological agents, that once above a certain threshold can induce negative effects. These pollutants originate from human activities and enter the marine environment through various pathways. There are many thousands of pollutants that have been added or created by human processes, and for most of which, the available knowledge is very scarce. Agriculture, coastal tourism and recreation, port and harbor activities, urban and industrial development, mining, fisheries, and aquaculture, are all sources of marine pollution. Despite the increasing volume of scientific literature addressing cumulative impacts, there is a huge gap in the knowledge on how different pressures may interact, what are their resulting effects, and what conservation and management decisions should be made to protect and restore marine ecosystems.

This Research Topic will consider all novel contributions to the field of marine pollution, including studies on, emerging issues, techniques and/or technologies for monitoring. Contributions can include original research articles, method developments and reviews. The aim is to develop a greater understanding of how different anthropogenic stressors can alter the marine systems, at scales ranging from individual species to entire habitats.


Keywords: man-made, species and habitat loss, monitoring techniques


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 April 2021 Abstract
30 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 April 2021 Abstract
30 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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