Research Topic

External Forcing on Volcanoes and Volcanic Processes: Observations, Analysis and Implications

About this Research Topic

Volcanoes are complex systems that evolve in space and time as a result of their internal dynamics. Volcanic eruptions represent the ultimate expression of a complex interplay between endogenous and external processes that span different length and time scales.

Deciphering how internal and external processes interact at various scales in magmatic and volcanic systems will help us to shed light on the conditions that may modulate magma rise, flow and storage; unrest, failure and the triggering of volcanic eruptions; and the periodic behaviors that characterize the eruptive histories of many volcanic systems. Unraveling the temporal evolution of volcanic unrest and activity on both short and long timescales may help to improve our capabilities for understanding volcanic pasts, assessing volcanic hazards, and, ultimately, forecasting capacity and skill.

For a long time, (pseudo) cycles have been detected in volcanic systems on both short timescales from measurements of seismic activity, degassing, and eruptive frequency and intensity; and longer timescales, from the changes in the rate of occurrence of volcanic eruptions, or changes in eruptive flux. Technical developments and improvements in processing methods have enhanced our capacity to recognise these periodic signals in various volcanological data sets, revealing evidence for exogeneous sources such as Earth tides, or seasonal hydrological variations to modulation forced by climate. Regional tectonics and earthquakes, in particular, fall also into this category by modifying the stress state at volcanoes. By acting on the pore-fluid pressure, or the stress field (dynamic and static stresses), of an active plumbing system these external processes may induce changes in the dynamical state of the volcano constituting the ultimate trigger that may lead an active volcano to erupt.

External processes considered in this Research Topic include but are not restricted to:
- hydrological;
- climate/weather;
- tectonic;
- astronomical (Earth tides..).

The objective of this Research Topic is to gather studies providing new insights on the influence of external processes on volcanic systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Studies dedicated to the analysis and interpretation of observational data, theoretical modelling, methodological and experimental approaches are welcome as well as studies focused on a specific volcano, or considering global data sets. Original Research, Methods, Review, Hypothesis and Theory, and Perspective articles integrating specific volcanological, geochemical, geological and geophysical data sets as well as multidisciplinary measurements are encouraged, so are studies aiming at deciphering underlying mechanism or the balance between external and internal processes that are of prime importance for volcanic hazard assessment.


Keywords: external forcing, modulation of volcanic processes, eruption triggering, periodic variations and behaviors, short and long time scales


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Volcanoes are complex systems that evolve in space and time as a result of their internal dynamics. Volcanic eruptions represent the ultimate expression of a complex interplay between endogenous and external processes that span different length and time scales.

Deciphering how internal and external processes interact at various scales in magmatic and volcanic systems will help us to shed light on the conditions that may modulate magma rise, flow and storage; unrest, failure and the triggering of volcanic eruptions; and the periodic behaviors that characterize the eruptive histories of many volcanic systems. Unraveling the temporal evolution of volcanic unrest and activity on both short and long timescales may help to improve our capabilities for understanding volcanic pasts, assessing volcanic hazards, and, ultimately, forecasting capacity and skill.

For a long time, (pseudo) cycles have been detected in volcanic systems on both short timescales from measurements of seismic activity, degassing, and eruptive frequency and intensity; and longer timescales, from the changes in the rate of occurrence of volcanic eruptions, or changes in eruptive flux. Technical developments and improvements in processing methods have enhanced our capacity to recognise these periodic signals in various volcanological data sets, revealing evidence for exogeneous sources such as Earth tides, or seasonal hydrological variations to modulation forced by climate. Regional tectonics and earthquakes, in particular, fall also into this category by modifying the stress state at volcanoes. By acting on the pore-fluid pressure, or the stress field (dynamic and static stresses), of an active plumbing system these external processes may induce changes in the dynamical state of the volcano constituting the ultimate trigger that may lead an active volcano to erupt.

External processes considered in this Research Topic include but are not restricted to:
- hydrological;
- climate/weather;
- tectonic;
- astronomical (Earth tides..).

The objective of this Research Topic is to gather studies providing new insights on the influence of external processes on volcanic systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Studies dedicated to the analysis and interpretation of observational data, theoretical modelling, methodological and experimental approaches are welcome as well as studies focused on a specific volcano, or considering global data sets. Original Research, Methods, Review, Hypothesis and Theory, and Perspective articles integrating specific volcanological, geochemical, geological and geophysical data sets as well as multidisciplinary measurements are encouraged, so are studies aiming at deciphering underlying mechanism or the balance between external and internal processes that are of prime importance for volcanic hazard assessment.


Keywords: external forcing, modulation of volcanic processes, eruption triggering, periodic variations and behaviors, short and long time scales


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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