Research Topic

Mechanistic Insights Towards Understanding the ‘Integrated-Adaptive Strategies’ in Fish Under Ecologically Relevant Multiple-Stressors

About this Research Topic

Increasing human pressure including climate change creates a variety of deleterious impacts on animals. It is well anticipated that aquatic animals may simultaneously experience a suite of stressors which can act independently or act together to impede the resilience to pollutants causing adverse effects.  As ...

Increasing human pressure including climate change creates a variety of deleterious impacts on animals. It is well anticipated that aquatic animals may simultaneously experience a suite of stressors which can act independently or act together to impede the resilience to pollutants causing adverse effects.  As a stress-matrix, a variety of biotic and abiotic stress conditions can occur in natural habitats and in culture-based system either individually or in combination. It is understood that fish responses to different stresses are coordinated by complex and often interconnected signaling pathways regulating numerous physiological, biochemical and metabolic networks which are controlled at gene level. The compensatory response set in motion by a specific stress can differ from those activated by a combination of several environmental stresses. Recent studies revealed that the response of fish to a combination of two or more stressors cannot always directly be deducted from the response to each of the individual stressors. 

There is scarcity of the studies which tends to unveil the mechanisms regulating the underlying adaptive (and acclimatization) processes to a variety of stressors when occurring concomitantly. This Research Topic will advance our understanding on integrated fish response (from organismal, physiological to transcriptome level) towards multiple-stressors typically induced by anthropogenic activities and climate change -encompassing eutrophication, salinity drift, heavy metals, pesticides, feed limitation, exhaustive swimming, hypoxia, ocean acidification, noxious algal bloom etc. This will also assist to identify the key environmental cues whose fluctuation, both individually and in combination, can threaten the performance of aquatic animals, thereby assisting to formulate the guidelines for the regulation of certain environmental factors for ecological sustainability. This will be of enormous significance for the aquaculture industry, aquatic resources managers, enhancing growth and performance of aquatic animals in stressful/polluted water and the quality of food being provided to citizens.

The scope revolves around integrated research on aquatic (marine and freshwater) science, comparative (fish and shellfish) physiology, biomonitoring, environmental pollution and risk assessment.


Keywords: Ecophysiology, Toxicology, Aquaculture, Defense, Pollution


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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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