Research Topic

Advances in Rowing Physiology

About this Research Topic

Performance in Olympic rowing requires contributions from physiology, biomechanics, training, coaching, psychology, and sports medicine. The physical demands of rowing impose unique physiological challenges to rowers with implications not only for their physical, technical and mental preparation for competition, but also for health and longevity. Even though early inquiries on rowing were skeptical regarding the unhealthy implications of the harsh physiological demands and the associated extreme homeostatic disturbance, now it is well recognized that rowing is not only suitable for demonstrating the Olympic ideal of supreme challenge, but also confers valuable health benefits, especially with regards to osteoporosis and sarcopenia that become increasingly concerning later in life. Furthermore, technological developments from engineering, boat design, and material science are required for equipment development that critically influence performance.

Considering the vast amount of new information generated from such multitude of disciplines, the goal of this Research Topic is to collect the most recent advances and provide a resource focused on advances in rowing. Such goal requires the contribution from different disciplines within not only sports sciences but also other relevant fields that contribute to development of equipment (i.e. oars, boat, riggers) inherently involved in rowing. Furthermore, with the increasing popularity of indoor rowing as a recreational exercise modality, besides an off-water training aid for competitive rowers, a comprehensive inquiry on rowing should also include contributions on indoor rowing.

Contributions of original research articles or focused reviews addressing Physiology, Biomechanics, Training, Injuries, Rehabilitation, Sports Medicine, Coaching, Psychology, Sociology, Sport management and History relevant to rowing are invited. Areas of inquiry could include physiological indices that predict performance and an overview of rowing performance development over time. In addition, original articles, or perspectives, addressing technological, engineering, naval design or material developments relevant to the equipment involved in rowing are welcome.


Keywords: Physiology, Biomechanics, Psychology, Training, Performance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Performance in Olympic rowing requires contributions from physiology, biomechanics, training, coaching, psychology, and sports medicine. The physical demands of rowing impose unique physiological challenges to rowers with implications not only for their physical, technical and mental preparation for competition, but also for health and longevity. Even though early inquiries on rowing were skeptical regarding the unhealthy implications of the harsh physiological demands and the associated extreme homeostatic disturbance, now it is well recognized that rowing is not only suitable for demonstrating the Olympic ideal of supreme challenge, but also confers valuable health benefits, especially with regards to osteoporosis and sarcopenia that become increasingly concerning later in life. Furthermore, technological developments from engineering, boat design, and material science are required for equipment development that critically influence performance.

Considering the vast amount of new information generated from such multitude of disciplines, the goal of this Research Topic is to collect the most recent advances and provide a resource focused on advances in rowing. Such goal requires the contribution from different disciplines within not only sports sciences but also other relevant fields that contribute to development of equipment (i.e. oars, boat, riggers) inherently involved in rowing. Furthermore, with the increasing popularity of indoor rowing as a recreational exercise modality, besides an off-water training aid for competitive rowers, a comprehensive inquiry on rowing should also include contributions on indoor rowing.

Contributions of original research articles or focused reviews addressing Physiology, Biomechanics, Training, Injuries, Rehabilitation, Sports Medicine, Coaching, Psychology, Sociology, Sport management and History relevant to rowing are invited. Areas of inquiry could include physiological indices that predict performance and an overview of rowing performance development over time. In addition, original articles, or perspectives, addressing technological, engineering, naval design or material developments relevant to the equipment involved in rowing are welcome.


Keywords: Physiology, Biomechanics, Psychology, Training, Performance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

05 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

05 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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