Research Topic

Glomerular Filtration Rate in Chronic Kidney Disease

About this Research Topic

The kidney is a vascularized organ which receives 20-25% of cardiac output has functions which are excretory, endocrine, and metabolic in nature. Any clinical situation that causes reduction of functioning nephrons can evolve into chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as “abnormalities in kidney structure or function, present for 3 months, with implications for health”.

Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) is recognized as the best global index of renal function since its decline usually correlates with kidney functional mass, and is the most potent tool in the identification of CKD. CFR also assists in identifying the risk of progression of CKD, calculating the dosage of drugs excreted by the kidney, and in the preparation for invasive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Furthermore, renal function deterioration increases the risk of cardiovascular-related death in CKD and other non-communicable chronic diseases. GFR can be accurately measured using substances that completely filter through the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and are not secreted or reabsorbed in renal tubules (inulin, iohexol, iotalamate, etc.). However, these methods are usually reserved for research, given their complexity and cost.

Since CKD is highly prevalent in the general population, general practitioners and clinicians should be aware of the strengths and limitations of the method chosen to evaluate GFR and able to recognize the circumstances in which glomerular hyperfiltration results in renal damage, and know which treatment can reduce progression to CKD.

In this Research Topic, we are interested in updates on the mechanisms of damage involved in the aetiologies of CKD and further the influence of GFR in identifying risk factors, such as:

• Low nephron mass
• Proteinuric nephropathies
• Obesity
• Hypertension
• Diabetes
• Ageing
• Rare diseases such as lysosomal cases in adults and children.

Here, we believe pathophysiologic knowledge of these areas will improve early diagnosis and treatment selection in primary care level, contributing to a reduction in the burden of CKD.


Keywords: Glomerular Filtration Rate, Chronic Kidney Disease, Renal Function, Risk Factors, Neuropathy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The kidney is a vascularized organ which receives 20-25% of cardiac output has functions which are excretory, endocrine, and metabolic in nature. Any clinical situation that causes reduction of functioning nephrons can evolve into chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as “abnormalities in kidney structure or function, present for 3 months, with implications for health”.

Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) is recognized as the best global index of renal function since its decline usually correlates with kidney functional mass, and is the most potent tool in the identification of CKD. CFR also assists in identifying the risk of progression of CKD, calculating the dosage of drugs excreted by the kidney, and in the preparation for invasive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Furthermore, renal function deterioration increases the risk of cardiovascular-related death in CKD and other non-communicable chronic diseases. GFR can be accurately measured using substances that completely filter through the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and are not secreted or reabsorbed in renal tubules (inulin, iohexol, iotalamate, etc.). However, these methods are usually reserved for research, given their complexity and cost.

Since CKD is highly prevalent in the general population, general practitioners and clinicians should be aware of the strengths and limitations of the method chosen to evaluate GFR and able to recognize the circumstances in which glomerular hyperfiltration results in renal damage, and know which treatment can reduce progression to CKD.

In this Research Topic, we are interested in updates on the mechanisms of damage involved in the aetiologies of CKD and further the influence of GFR in identifying risk factors, such as:

• Low nephron mass
• Proteinuric nephropathies
• Obesity
• Hypertension
• Diabetes
• Ageing
• Rare diseases such as lysosomal cases in adults and children.

Here, we believe pathophysiologic knowledge of these areas will improve early diagnosis and treatment selection in primary care level, contributing to a reduction in the burden of CKD.


Keywords: Glomerular Filtration Rate, Chronic Kidney Disease, Renal Function, Risk Factors, Neuropathy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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