Research Topic

Endocrine Disruption in Marine Invertebrates

About this Research Topic

Endocrine disruption by compounds that can interfere with hormonal synthesis and regulation in wildlife and humans have been studied for many years, particularly in freshwater environments, but less so in marine environments, including more recently in testing existing and new products and compounds. The contamination of seafood resources with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is still an uncertain quantity in environmental monitoring due to the multiplicity of EDCs, and the lack of basic biological knowledge, monitoring tools, and instrumental support. Thus, marine environmental changes are likely to occur, and in some instances have been demonstrated globally, but researchers are currently underprepared to study and respond to them.

The study of endocrine disruption in marine invertebrates may explain and highlight some of the changes occurring in marine communities around the world. Marine invertebrates are effective indicators, given the reactivity of these organisms to environmental changes. In particular, subtle alterations in reproduction, sexual differentiation, development, and growth of such marine taxa provide ample opportunity to study endocrine disruption.

Given the current lack of basic research, this Research Topic will gather recent research on the effects of endocrine disruption in marine invertebrates, particularly as it relates to reproduction, thyroid-like disruptions, growth, and development. Work relating to under-studied marine invertebrates, such as echinoderms and annelids, is also welcome. We welcome authors to submit original research, reviews, and mini reviews focused on the above themes as well as the following sub-themes:

• Mechanisms of interference in invertebrate hormonal controls,
• Detection and evaluation of endocrine disruption in wild populations,
• Environmental monitoring using endocrine disruption responses,
• Inexpensive and simple tools for environmental monitoring of invertebrates,
• Possible ecological effects of endocrine disruption on marine invertebrate communities,
• Historical trends and future projections for endocrine disruptors on marine invertebrates.


Keywords: Environmental Changes, Endocrine disruption, Marine wildlife, Ecologic damage, Human health


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Endocrine disruption by compounds that can interfere with hormonal synthesis and regulation in wildlife and humans have been studied for many years, particularly in freshwater environments, but less so in marine environments, including more recently in testing existing and new products and compounds. The contamination of seafood resources with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is still an uncertain quantity in environmental monitoring due to the multiplicity of EDCs, and the lack of basic biological knowledge, monitoring tools, and instrumental support. Thus, marine environmental changes are likely to occur, and in some instances have been demonstrated globally, but researchers are currently underprepared to study and respond to them.

The study of endocrine disruption in marine invertebrates may explain and highlight some of the changes occurring in marine communities around the world. Marine invertebrates are effective indicators, given the reactivity of these organisms to environmental changes. In particular, subtle alterations in reproduction, sexual differentiation, development, and growth of such marine taxa provide ample opportunity to study endocrine disruption.

Given the current lack of basic research, this Research Topic will gather recent research on the effects of endocrine disruption in marine invertebrates, particularly as it relates to reproduction, thyroid-like disruptions, growth, and development. Work relating to under-studied marine invertebrates, such as echinoderms and annelids, is also welcome. We welcome authors to submit original research, reviews, and mini reviews focused on the above themes as well as the following sub-themes:

• Mechanisms of interference in invertebrate hormonal controls,
• Detection and evaluation of endocrine disruption in wild populations,
• Environmental monitoring using endocrine disruption responses,
• Inexpensive and simple tools for environmental monitoring of invertebrates,
• Possible ecological effects of endocrine disruption on marine invertebrate communities,
• Historical trends and future projections for endocrine disruptors on marine invertebrates.


Keywords: Environmental Changes, Endocrine disruption, Marine wildlife, Ecologic damage, Human health


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

22 June 2021 Abstract
13 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

22 June 2021 Abstract
13 October 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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