Research Topic

New insights on Basic and Clinical Aspects of EEG and MEG connectome

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Previous studies have shown that EEG and MEG cortical oscillations in specific frequency bands (i.e., delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma) are functionally related to cognitive processing and behavior, and that abnormal patterns correlate with pathophysiological processes of neuropsychiatric disorders. Basar ...

Previous studies have shown that EEG and MEG cortical oscillations in specific frequency bands (i.e., delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma) are functionally related to cognitive processing and behavior, and that abnormal patterns correlate with pathophysiological processes of neuropsychiatric disorders. Basar have proposed that these cortical oscillations may interact with each other as “passletters”, a kind of information code for brain networks, so-called “brain alphabet” (Basar, 1999). Although these results have provided useful insights for neural communication in the human brain, they appeared to be highly speculative based on the level of EEG analyses performed (simple averaging method, wavelet analysis on the sensor level, etc.). The development of new analysis methods for EEG and MEG signals has allowed researchers to partially validate the “brain alphabet” hypothesis, by precisely localizing sources of oscillatory activity related to brain functions or pathological processes. However, this kind of approach, characterizing brain activity purely in terms of anatomically segregated responses, is not sufficient to explain the pathophysiology of complex neuropsychiatric disorders or the mechanisms underlying cognitive functions.

Recent advances in the neuroimaging field areas allow us to visualize the aggregate of neural connections at the macroscopic level within the brain, the so-called “connectome”. In order to promote the development of the neurophysiological investigation of connectome of brain oscillations, this Frontiers Research Topic aims at bringing together contributions from researchers in basic and clinical neuroscience using EEG and MEG connectome analysis. The most important focal point will be to address the functional roles of connectome of brain oscillations in contributing to understandings of higher cognitive processes and pathophysiology of psychiatric diseases.

For this Research Topic, we, therefore, solicit reviews, original research articles, opinion and method papers, which address the investigation of EEG and MEG connectome. This Research Topic will create new insights concerning the neurobiology of functional connectivity.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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