Research Topic

Stress-related Diseases and Dysfunctions

About this Research Topic

Inadequate responses to environmental challenges are known to be a risk factor in the development of dysfunctions and diseases. However, the mechanistic features underlying different pathophysiological processes triggered from stressful situations are poorly understood. Global epidemiological data show that the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in the stress-related diseases, and therapeutic arsenal against these diseases need to be broadened, in order to pave ways for novel and efficient therapeutic approaches interfering directly with the morbidity and mortality.

The aim of this Research Topic, as Integrative Physiology, is to collect high quality science that unravels details on the mechanisms involved in the dysfunctions and diseases related to acute and chronic stress exposure, in different experimental models.

This Research Topic welcomes manuscripts resulting from cutting-edge research that approach neurobiological, autonomic, metabolic, hemodynamic, endocrine, behavioral and pharmacological aspects involved in the pathophysiology and treatments of dysfunctions and diseases found in different models of acute and chronic stress exposure.


Keywords: stress, neurobiology, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Inadequate responses to environmental challenges are known to be a risk factor in the development of dysfunctions and diseases. However, the mechanistic features underlying different pathophysiological processes triggered from stressful situations are poorly understood. Global epidemiological data show that the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in the stress-related diseases, and therapeutic arsenal against these diseases need to be broadened, in order to pave ways for novel and efficient therapeutic approaches interfering directly with the morbidity and mortality.

The aim of this Research Topic, as Integrative Physiology, is to collect high quality science that unravels details on the mechanisms involved in the dysfunctions and diseases related to acute and chronic stress exposure, in different experimental models.

This Research Topic welcomes manuscripts resulting from cutting-edge research that approach neurobiological, autonomic, metabolic, hemodynamic, endocrine, behavioral and pharmacological aspects involved in the pathophysiology and treatments of dysfunctions and diseases found in different models of acute and chronic stress exposure.


Keywords: stress, neurobiology, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2021 Abstract
15 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2021 Abstract
15 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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