Research Topic

Targeting GPCRs in bone diseases

About this Research Topic

Background: Throughout life, the healthy skeleton has the capacity for remodelling, a reactive process requiring precisely balanced osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic resorption. Disruption in bone remodelling leads to a variety of bone diseases, causing significant social and economic burden. Whilst the use of bisphosphonates as the first-line treatment for bone diseases started more than 40 years ago, new and improved therapies are therefore constantly needed. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), one of the largest and important transmembrane protein families, serve as increasingly attractive drug targets due to increased understanding of their critical roles in cellular activity during the bone remodelling process.

Goal: GPCRs mediate cellular responses to extracellular signals including most metabolites, cytokines, neurotransmitters, and hormones, and therefore represent the most promising target for drug discovery, with ~34% of all drugs approved by FDA being GPCRs targeted. Currently, 92 GPCRs have been associated with bone diseases and dysfunctions. This, combined with advances in research of GPCR allosteric modulators and biased agonists, has led to new opportunities for both novel and established GPCR targets in treating bone diseases. Therefore, this Research Topic aims to promote studies investigating novel GPCRs signalling mechanisms controlling cellular activity in bone, in order to open new avenues for identifying novel GPCR based therapeutic targets in bone diseases.

Scope: The scope of this Research Topic is GPCRs related pre-clinical and clinical bone research. We welcome the submission of all article types, including but not limited to Original Research, Review, Mini-Review, Methods, Protocols, Perspective and Opinion articles. Specific themes we would like to, but not exclusively, address on are: - Novel GPCRs signalling mechanisms involved in osteoclast, osteoblast, osteocyte, chondrocyte, and their progenitor cells - Advances in genetic findings of GPCRs in bone diseases, particularly osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and cancer induced bone diseases - New developments in GPCR modulators and biased agonists in bone biology - Innovative methods or model systems to investigate GPCRs in clinical and preclinical studies


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Background: Throughout life, the healthy skeleton has the capacity for remodelling, a reactive process requiring precisely balanced osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic resorption. Disruption in bone remodelling leads to a variety of bone diseases, causing significant social and economic burden. Whilst the use of bisphosphonates as the first-line treatment for bone diseases started more than 40 years ago, new and improved therapies are therefore constantly needed. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), one of the largest and important transmembrane protein families, serve as increasingly attractive drug targets due to increased understanding of their critical roles in cellular activity during the bone remodelling process.

Goal: GPCRs mediate cellular responses to extracellular signals including most metabolites, cytokines, neurotransmitters, and hormones, and therefore represent the most promising target for drug discovery, with ~34% of all drugs approved by FDA being GPCRs targeted. Currently, 92 GPCRs have been associated with bone diseases and dysfunctions. This, combined with advances in research of GPCR allosteric modulators and biased agonists, has led to new opportunities for both novel and established GPCR targets in treating bone diseases. Therefore, this Research Topic aims to promote studies investigating novel GPCRs signalling mechanisms controlling cellular activity in bone, in order to open new avenues for identifying novel GPCR based therapeutic targets in bone diseases.

Scope: The scope of this Research Topic is GPCRs related pre-clinical and clinical bone research. We welcome the submission of all article types, including but not limited to Original Research, Review, Mini-Review, Methods, Protocols, Perspective and Opinion articles. Specific themes we would like to, but not exclusively, address on are: - Novel GPCRs signalling mechanisms involved in osteoclast, osteoblast, osteocyte, chondrocyte, and their progenitor cells - Advances in genetic findings of GPCRs in bone diseases, particularly osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and cancer induced bone diseases - New developments in GPCR modulators and biased agonists in bone biology - Innovative methods or model systems to investigate GPCRs in clinical and preclinical studies


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

10 May 2021 Abstract
07 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

10 May 2021 Abstract
07 September 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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