Research Topic

Biofilm-Mediated Nosocomial Infections and its Association with Antimicrobial Resistance: Detection, Prevention, and Management

About this Research Topic

The causative agents of nosocomial infections have been shown to form robust biofilms. The recurrent and chronic nature of nosocomial infections has been attributed to biofilm formation. Such infections are difficult to detect and treat clinically. 


Biofilms can form both on medical devices and within human tissues. They play a vital role in aiding the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) through their complex microbial colony structure, which enhances inter- and intra-species exchange of AMR genes, ensures protection from antimicrobial penetration and enhances persistence. It is estimated that biofilm-associated AMR costs the UK >£1M and results in 0.5M deaths per year globally.


Currently, clinicians empirically treat biofilm infections with prolonged high doses of a combination of antibiotics which can lead to a further rise of AMR. This necessitates the need to understand the adverse effect of biofilm-mediated infections on antimicrobial therapy.


Though several reports have been published on biofilms and antimicrobial resistance individually, there is still a lacuna of reports pertaining to the significant association of these factors, and their contribution to increasing AMR burden from a clinical perspective. This section of articles will try to throw light on the actual burden of biofilm-mediated infections, and an enhanced understanding of the screening methodologies, occurrence, and molecular epidemiology, including alternative approaches for management.


The scope of this Research Topic would be to explore the prevalence of biofilm-mediated infections across the globe, detection technologies, and to compile state-of-the-art strategies in managing biofilm-associated nosocomial infections. 


The Topic could include articles that cover, but are not limited to, the following:


• Surveillance of biofilm-mediated infections including bacteremia, ophthalmological, orthopedic, surgical site, and urinary tract infections.

• Clinical evidences of antimicrobial therapy on mono-/polymicrobial biofilms.

• Novel biofilm detection technologies.

• Molecular epidemiology of AMR clones with biofilm-forming potential

• Molecular mechanism driving the spread of AMR in biofilm-mediated infections

• New approaches for prevention and control of biofilm infections

• Novel resistant types due to biofilms


Article types submitted to this Research Topic can be Original Research, Review, Brief Research Report, Opinion and Methods articles.



Keywords: biofilm, nosocomial infections, antimicrobial resistance, disease surveillance, molecular epidemiology, next generation sequencing


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The causative agents of nosocomial infections have been shown to form robust biofilms. The recurrent and chronic nature of nosocomial infections has been attributed to biofilm formation. Such infections are difficult to detect and treat clinically. 


Biofilms can form both on medical devices and within human tissues. They play a vital role in aiding the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) through their complex microbial colony structure, which enhances inter- and intra-species exchange of AMR genes, ensures protection from antimicrobial penetration and enhances persistence. It is estimated that biofilm-associated AMR costs the UK >£1M and results in 0.5M deaths per year globally.


Currently, clinicians empirically treat biofilm infections with prolonged high doses of a combination of antibiotics which can lead to a further rise of AMR. This necessitates the need to understand the adverse effect of biofilm-mediated infections on antimicrobial therapy.


Though several reports have been published on biofilms and antimicrobial resistance individually, there is still a lacuna of reports pertaining to the significant association of these factors, and their contribution to increasing AMR burden from a clinical perspective. This section of articles will try to throw light on the actual burden of biofilm-mediated infections, and an enhanced understanding of the screening methodologies, occurrence, and molecular epidemiology, including alternative approaches for management.


The scope of this Research Topic would be to explore the prevalence of biofilm-mediated infections across the globe, detection technologies, and to compile state-of-the-art strategies in managing biofilm-associated nosocomial infections. 


The Topic could include articles that cover, but are not limited to, the following:


• Surveillance of biofilm-mediated infections including bacteremia, ophthalmological, orthopedic, surgical site, and urinary tract infections.

• Clinical evidences of antimicrobial therapy on mono-/polymicrobial biofilms.

• Novel biofilm detection technologies.

• Molecular epidemiology of AMR clones with biofilm-forming potential

• Molecular mechanism driving the spread of AMR in biofilm-mediated infections

• New approaches for prevention and control of biofilm infections

• Novel resistant types due to biofilms


Article types submitted to this Research Topic can be Original Research, Review, Brief Research Report, Opinion and Methods articles.



Keywords: biofilm, nosocomial infections, antimicrobial resistance, disease surveillance, molecular epidemiology, next generation sequencing


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2021 Abstract
31 August 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2021 Abstract
31 August 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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