Research Topic

Non intubated thoracic surgery: from concepts to clinical reality

About this Research Topic

At present, there is no scientific agreement regarding indications, advantages, choice of anesthetic technique and intraoperative management of patients during non intubated thoracic surgery (NITS). The aim of this series is to study the current techniques and the most relevant aspects of NITS. Especially, we will discuss the short-term results of NITS combined with minimally invasive surgery.

The purpose of this special issue is to analyze the pathophysiology of spontaneous ventilation during non intubated thoracic surgery, to evaluate and compare different anesthesia techniques, to review and discuss indications, contraindications, intraoperative difficulties management and criteria for conversion to general anesthesia.

With this Research Topic, we aim to explore the latest developments and future prospects of NITS.

We welcome submissions of Clinical Trials, Mini Reviews, Reviews, Systematic Reviews, and Original Researches.

General anesthesia with endobronchial intubation and one-lung positive-pressure ventilation has always been considered mandatory for thoracic surgery. In recent years, interest in thoracic surgery without tracheal intubation has increased, in order to reduce the risks of intubation-related airway trauma, ventilation-induced lung injury, residual neuromuscular blockade, and postoperative nausea. This technique was initially applied to minor procedures only, particularly in high-risk patients; eventually, its feasibility has been demonstrated even for major lung resections.

The association of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and less invasive anesthetic techniques can bring to less complications and faster postoperative recovery, as described by several authors. Nevertheless, the surgical and anesthesiology community is still skeptic, especially due to the risks of conversion to intubated general anesthesia.


Keywords: Thoracic Surgery, Anesthesia, Awake thoracoscopic surgery, Non-small cell lung cancer, Lung volume reduction surgery, Nonincubated thoracoscopic surgery, Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

At present, there is no scientific agreement regarding indications, advantages, choice of anesthetic technique and intraoperative management of patients during non intubated thoracic surgery (NITS). The aim of this series is to study the current techniques and the most relevant aspects of NITS. Especially, we will discuss the short-term results of NITS combined with minimally invasive surgery.

The purpose of this special issue is to analyze the pathophysiology of spontaneous ventilation during non intubated thoracic surgery, to evaluate and compare different anesthesia techniques, to review and discuss indications, contraindications, intraoperative difficulties management and criteria for conversion to general anesthesia.

With this Research Topic, we aim to explore the latest developments and future prospects of NITS.

We welcome submissions of Clinical Trials, Mini Reviews, Reviews, Systematic Reviews, and Original Researches.

General anesthesia with endobronchial intubation and one-lung positive-pressure ventilation has always been considered mandatory for thoracic surgery. In recent years, interest in thoracic surgery without tracheal intubation has increased, in order to reduce the risks of intubation-related airway trauma, ventilation-induced lung injury, residual neuromuscular blockade, and postoperative nausea. This technique was initially applied to minor procedures only, particularly in high-risk patients; eventually, its feasibility has been demonstrated even for major lung resections.

The association of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and less invasive anesthetic techniques can bring to less complications and faster postoperative recovery, as described by several authors. Nevertheless, the surgical and anesthesiology community is still skeptic, especially due to the risks of conversion to intubated general anesthesia.


Keywords: Thoracic Surgery, Anesthesia, Awake thoracoscopic surgery, Non-small cell lung cancer, Lung volume reduction surgery, Nonincubated thoracoscopic surgery, Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

24 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

24 November 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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