Research Topic

Acute and chronic changes in postural control in response to different physiological states and external environmental conditions

About this Research Topic

Human postural control is complex and as such underlined with multi-layer sensory-motor neural processing. Short- and long-term responses and adaptations to physiological or environmental stressors such as exercise, heat, cold, altitude, hypoxia, fasting, and water immersion are well known. Although these stressors cause fatigue, as well as deterioration of performance and body functions, they can also elicit favorable long-term adaptations. Cardiorespiratory and hematological responses and adaptations to such stressors have already been well investigated, however, less is known about how the body responds in terms of neuromuscular control.

The proper level of postural control and coordination is of paramount importance for safe movements, be it in the general population, athletes, or older adults. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to explore the topic to provide excellent knowledge and share new methodological considerations that would help to better understand how the human body responds to physiological stress in terms of postural control. On one hand, it is important to be aware of the potential (acute or chronic) debilitating effects of physiological stress in order to manage it when possible. On the other hand, the potential positive effects of physiological stress and staying or training in different environments can be exploited to advance clinical practices and athletic training.

In this collection, we welcome original papers, review as well as short papers, that investigate:

· Acute responses of human postural control to various physiological stressors (including, but not limited to exercise, heat, cold, altitude, hypoxia, fasting, and water immersion);
· Interventional studies investigating adaptations of neuromuscular control of posture (and the associated underlying mechanisms) to physiological stressors;
· Acute and long-term responses of postural control to interventions manipulating the sensory information available to the central nervous system;
· Methodological studies exploring the sensitivity of new approaches to the assessment of postural control to exposure to physiological or environmental stressors as a variable;
· We also encourage age, gender, and any other subgroup (e.g. fallers vs. non-fallers) comparisons as primary or secondary analysis.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Human postural control is complex and as such underlined with multi-layer sensory-motor neural processing. Short- and long-term responses and adaptations to physiological or environmental stressors such as exercise, heat, cold, altitude, hypoxia, fasting, and water immersion are well known. Although these stressors cause fatigue, as well as deterioration of performance and body functions, they can also elicit favorable long-term adaptations. Cardiorespiratory and hematological responses and adaptations to such stressors have already been well investigated, however, less is known about how the body responds in terms of neuromuscular control.

The proper level of postural control and coordination is of paramount importance for safe movements, be it in the general population, athletes, or older adults. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to explore the topic to provide excellent knowledge and share new methodological considerations that would help to better understand how the human body responds to physiological stress in terms of postural control. On one hand, it is important to be aware of the potential (acute or chronic) debilitating effects of physiological stress in order to manage it when possible. On the other hand, the potential positive effects of physiological stress and staying or training in different environments can be exploited to advance clinical practices and athletic training.

In this collection, we welcome original papers, review as well as short papers, that investigate:

· Acute responses of human postural control to various physiological stressors (including, but not limited to exercise, heat, cold, altitude, hypoxia, fasting, and water immersion);
· Interventional studies investigating adaptations of neuromuscular control of posture (and the associated underlying mechanisms) to physiological stressors;
· Acute and long-term responses of postural control to interventions manipulating the sensory information available to the central nervous system;
· Methodological studies exploring the sensitivity of new approaches to the assessment of postural control to exposure to physiological or environmental stressors as a variable;
· We also encourage age, gender, and any other subgroup (e.g. fallers vs. non-fallers) comparisons as primary or secondary analysis.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 November 2021 Abstract
30 June 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 November 2021 Abstract
30 June 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..