Research Topic

Non-Motor Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

About this Research Topic

The most recognizable symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are movement-related ("motor"). In 1984 Bodis-Wollner, Mylin, and Yahr published an experimental-based paper, ‘Nonmotor functions of the basal ganglia’, creating a label for a set of deficits centering on sensory and cognitive functions in Parkinson Disease patients. In the following decades, several studies appeared using the label “non-Motor dysfunctions” (NMD) in PD. Today NMD is a widely accepted term in Parkinson’s Disease and related disorders. Non-motor symptoms (NMS) include autonomic dysfunction (orthostatic hypotension, constipation), neuropsychiatric problems (mood, cognition, behavior or thought alterations), and sensory (especially altered vision, smell), and sleep difficulties.

The NMD literature is extensive, but not precisely well focused. Studies rarely distinguish between NM symptoms and NM manifestations linked to pathognomonic, morphological, molecular, and neuropharmacological changes in PD and NM symptoms without firm pathological substrates.

This Research Topic is devoted to introducing a taxonomy of NMD in PD. The essential approach in this collection is to relate individual NMS categories based on symptoms to impaired structure. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

• Papers that will establish the relationship of structure to deviant activity of a non-motor symptom (NMS) in PD and related disorders.
• Classification of NMS categories; sensory (visual/olfactory/somatosensory) impairment, cognitive impairment, and autonomic dysfunction. This categorization should provide a taxonomical framework for NMS in PD and related disorders.
• Papers identifying low-level and high-level symptoms of a category. For example, olfaction, since current literature suggests it may be advantageous to separate low-level detection of an odor from high-level discrimination of more than one odor.
• We welcome Reviews of existing literature and papers that inspire the field to design experiments to clarify existing knowledge and supply new directions.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The most recognizable symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are movement-related ("motor"). In 1984 Bodis-Wollner, Mylin, and Yahr published an experimental-based paper, ‘Nonmotor functions of the basal ganglia’, creating a label for a set of deficits centering on sensory and cognitive functions in Parkinson Disease patients. In the following decades, several studies appeared using the label “non-Motor dysfunctions” (NMD) in PD. Today NMD is a widely accepted term in Parkinson’s Disease and related disorders. Non-motor symptoms (NMS) include autonomic dysfunction (orthostatic hypotension, constipation), neuropsychiatric problems (mood, cognition, behavior or thought alterations), and sensory (especially altered vision, smell), and sleep difficulties.

The NMD literature is extensive, but not precisely well focused. Studies rarely distinguish between NM symptoms and NM manifestations linked to pathognomonic, morphological, molecular, and neuropharmacological changes in PD and NM symptoms without firm pathological substrates.

This Research Topic is devoted to introducing a taxonomy of NMD in PD. The essential approach in this collection is to relate individual NMS categories based on symptoms to impaired structure. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

• Papers that will establish the relationship of structure to deviant activity of a non-motor symptom (NMS) in PD and related disorders.
• Classification of NMS categories; sensory (visual/olfactory/somatosensory) impairment, cognitive impairment, and autonomic dysfunction. This categorization should provide a taxonomical framework for NMS in PD and related disorders.
• Papers identifying low-level and high-level symptoms of a category. For example, olfaction, since current literature suggests it may be advantageous to separate low-level detection of an odor from high-level discrimination of more than one odor.
• We welcome Reviews of existing literature and papers that inspire the field to design experiments to clarify existing knowledge and supply new directions.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

17 August 2021 Abstract
15 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

17 August 2021 Abstract
15 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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