Research Topic

Hypothalamic Obesity: Today and Future

About this Research Topic

Hypothalamic pathways play a fundamental role in the interrelationship between multiple afferent and efferent signals to assure normal energy metabolism. The altered gene expression of key neuromodulators involved in the regulation of energy balance induces a dysfunctional control of appetite/satiety. Patients, namely children, suffering Hypothalamic Obesity, either genetically/epigenetically or secondary to pituitary tumor surgery/irradiation, are characterized by the development of damaged afferent hypothalamic signaling of factors. This is due to the lack of integral necessary function (namely, several hypothalamic nuclei and areas) in charge of the coordinated orchestra regulating the release and transduction of key factors acting to appropriately modulate energy homeostasis. Although there are new and promising approaches, results from original studies and/or clinical trials developed toward the correction of a malfunctioning hypothalamus are still lacking.

In spite of this vacancy area, this Research Topic aims to encourage authors in presenting and discussing more research (either original, reviewing the international literature, or reporting data from clinical trials) that could help to better understand how to correct (e.g. through drug intervention) the dysfunctional central circuitry controlling appetite/satiety. Such correction would restore a normal control of energy metabolism, namely by resuming an appropriate body white adipose tissue mass and function, as well as its interplay with the autonomous nervous system. It is possible that a single known or new therapy could be not sufficient to restore a correct hypothalamic functionality and thus normal life. The effectiveness of combined-agent therapy could be expected as a beneficial approach for restoring healthy life.

In this Research Topic, we welcome the submission of Original Research and Review articles / opinion/ evidence-based perspective that include, but not limited to, the following sub-topics/areas:
• Signaling and neuroendocrine/endocrine aspects of the organ function in normal and specific disease;
• Positive and Negative Feedback system between the hypothalamus and the periphery;
• Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators involved in energy management; • Tissue microenvironment, transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate cellular, tissue and Organ Homeostasis;
• Hormonal regulation of energy homeostasis; • Pediatric surgery.


Keywords: Hypothalamic damage, unbalanced energy storage, pituitary tumors, radiotherapy, excessive appetite


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Hypothalamic pathways play a fundamental role in the interrelationship between multiple afferent and efferent signals to assure normal energy metabolism. The altered gene expression of key neuromodulators involved in the regulation of energy balance induces a dysfunctional control of appetite/satiety. Patients, namely children, suffering Hypothalamic Obesity, either genetically/epigenetically or secondary to pituitary tumor surgery/irradiation, are characterized by the development of damaged afferent hypothalamic signaling of factors. This is due to the lack of integral necessary function (namely, several hypothalamic nuclei and areas) in charge of the coordinated orchestra regulating the release and transduction of key factors acting to appropriately modulate energy homeostasis. Although there are new and promising approaches, results from original studies and/or clinical trials developed toward the correction of a malfunctioning hypothalamus are still lacking.

In spite of this vacancy area, this Research Topic aims to encourage authors in presenting and discussing more research (either original, reviewing the international literature, or reporting data from clinical trials) that could help to better understand how to correct (e.g. through drug intervention) the dysfunctional central circuitry controlling appetite/satiety. Such correction would restore a normal control of energy metabolism, namely by resuming an appropriate body white adipose tissue mass and function, as well as its interplay with the autonomous nervous system. It is possible that a single known or new therapy could be not sufficient to restore a correct hypothalamic functionality and thus normal life. The effectiveness of combined-agent therapy could be expected as a beneficial approach for restoring healthy life.

In this Research Topic, we welcome the submission of Original Research and Review articles / opinion/ evidence-based perspective that include, but not limited to, the following sub-topics/areas:
• Signaling and neuroendocrine/endocrine aspects of the organ function in normal and specific disease;
• Positive and Negative Feedback system between the hypothalamus and the periphery;
• Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators involved in energy management; • Tissue microenvironment, transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate cellular, tissue and Organ Homeostasis;
• Hormonal regulation of energy homeostasis; • Pediatric surgery.


Keywords: Hypothalamic damage, unbalanced energy storage, pituitary tumors, radiotherapy, excessive appetite


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

24 September 2021 Abstract
31 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

24 September 2021 Abstract
31 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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